Monthly Archives: September 2016

Improving Nutrition, Healthcare Outcomes in Older Adults

Nationwide, up to 60 percent of hospitalized older adults may be malnourished, with an estimated price tag of $51.3 billion. It is no surprise that a 300 percent increase in health care costs can be attributed to poor nutrition status.  In Oregon, Registered Dietitian Nutritionists are in the forefront of the fight to prevent and treat malnutrition.

Partnering with nutrition leaders, Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council is working to raise awareness and has gathered educational tools to help health professionals recognize and treat malnutrition. The resources also help older adults realize that they need to ask about nutrition and advocate for improved care.ask-about-your-nutrition

Oregon Governor Kate Brown joined the Oregon Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in shining the light on the impact of malnutrition – especially in older adults – by proclaiming September 26 to 30 as Malnutrition Awareness Week in Oregon.

Preventing and treating malnutrition can be as simple as following the MyPlate guidelines.  Eating enough food and the right amounts from each food group is the key. Protein is especially important.

Everyone, and especially those at risk of malnutrition such as the ill or elderly, should aim to consume 3-4 ounces of protein at each meal (30 grams). Protein-rich dairy foods are a convenient, affordable and tasty option for seniors.  Try milk (lactose-free, if needed), cheese, Greek yogurt, yogurt and cottage cheese.  Find out what a serving is and how you can get enough with these fact sheets:

Protein Pointers

Eating to Optimize Surgery or Treatment

Eating to Meet Your Body’s Needs

Eating for Your Best Health

Malnutrition awareness is important. Learn more about this issue at this link to a KPTV television story with Providence nutrition services.

Cooking Up New and Nutritious Recipes for School Kids

“What’s for lunch?” It’s a common refrain in school cafeterias across the state, and some tasty plans are in the works to provide exciting new and nutritious menu items. Thanks to a special series of events called “Oregon Cooks for Kids,” school cooks are learning new recipes featuring dairy ingredients that they can take back to their schools.

Sponsored by the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council and the Oregon Department of Education, Child Nutrition Services, seven statewide culinary trainings are being offered for school nutrition directors and cooks in 2016. This year’s schedule includes trainings in Albany, Hermiston, McMinnville, Central Point, Salem, La Grande and Klamath Falls.

Chef Garrett Berdan, RDN, coaches participants on cooking-from-scratch culinary skills, while preparing and taste testing 15 actual recipes. The preparation of healthy meals for students emphasizes nutrient-rich foods, because studies show that well-nourished kids perform better at school. Participants practice menu planning, weights and measures, knife skills and other culinary techniques.

The Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council has supported culinary training events for seven years. Oregon’s 228 dairy farm families and 31 dairy processors are involved with schools across the state — providing nutritious foods to kitchens and cafeterias and leading health and wellness initiatives.

Cafeteria cooks have new tricks up their sleevesCafeteria cooks have new tricks up their sleeves

Statewide culinary trainings are improving the quality and variety of meals served in Oregon schools. Learn more about what happens at these special events with this fun story from KGW TV’s Portland Today.   VIDEO

Healthy Meals for Healthy StudentsHealthy Meals for Healthy Students Trainings

Trainings are presented in partnership with the Oregon Department of Education Child Nutrition Programs and the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council. We train school nutrition and frontline staff, giving them ideas and skills to improve their school meal programs with nutrient-rich recipes, featuring ingredients like low-fat and fat-free milk, cheese and yogurt, whole grains, fruits and vegetables.   VIDEO

 

Inbound Trade Delegation Focuses on Dairy

This week, a delegation of 7 executives will be visiting Utah, Idaho, and Oregon on an inbound trade mission to explore opportunities for dairy exports from our region. The delegation will include buyers from six companies—three from Vietnam, two from Singapore, and one from Malaysia – most of which were visited last April by a group of Northwest processors on a trade mission from the Pacific Northwest.singapore

The delegation arrived Sunday September 25, starting in Utah, followed by Idaho visits and then ending in Oregon. They will meet with dairy processors, farmers and export and logistics professionals in all three states to learn more about product availability, quality, safety, milk sources, manufacturing processes and capabilities. This cooperative regional approach is supported by the dairy checkoff organizations in each of the three states.

“This visit represents a continuation of our ongoing efforts to develop dairy export opportunities over three previous trade missions,” said Pete Kent, Executive Director for the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council. “U.S dairy products are not well known in Southeast Asia, but we’re hoping to change that dynamic to earn a place at the table in one of the fastest growing emerging markets.”

Kent sees great potential in the near future for small and medium sized local businesses making artisan cheese and dairy ingredients. Another trade mission is already in the works that will bring these kinds of Oregon and Pacific Northwest dairy products to Vietnam in April 2017.

Throwing for Tokyo, Driven By Dairy

With the close of the Rio Olympics, the summer games will be out of sight and out of mind for most until the Olympic flame reignites in Japan in 2020. There are some though, whose competitive spirit still burns bright. Melissa Ausman, a national-caliber discus thrower and senior at Concordia University in Oregon, is one such athlete with her sights set on the Tokyo Olympics.melissa-ausman-headshot

It’s a long way to Tokyo from the dairy farm in Nyssa, Oregon, where Melissa grew up – 5,135 miles to be exact. And that dairy farm is where it all began, starting with her relentless work ethic and mental fortitude. Just ask her father, Frank.

“Melissa and all the kids basically started out just like I did as a kid out here; you start with taking care of the baby calves, haying and graining, and you work your way up the ladder,” he said. “Out here, you figure out real quick that it doesn’t matter what day it is or how cold or hot it is or whatever, the work has to be done.”dairy farm in nyssa oregon

Melissa agreed, “There are no days off when you’re on the dairy, or trying to reach your goals.”

Ausman began throwing for sport in seventh grade, when she discovered her drive to become an Olympic athlete. Her throwing career was instigated by her competitive side, urging her to throw better than her older brother. She continued to improve over the years that followed, winning state in high school, setting records at Oregon State University, and now training for that next big step at Concordia University.

Currently, she can throw a discus 53.91 meters (176.87 feet), which is beyond the width of an NFL football field. This distance has Ausman just 40 feet away from qualifying for the Olympics. Within two years, she will achieve this mark if she continues to add distance at her current pace.

Ausman has immersed herself completely into her training. Even on her weekly rest day where she stays home from the gym, she continually trains her mind by learning how to improve. That means keeping current on Olympic medalists and working aspects of their training into her routines. She has also learned the importance of balance. melissa-ausman-training

“I’m a sister, daughter, student, athlete — and each one represents a spoke on a wheel,” said Ausman. “If I spend too much on one spoke, then I have a lumpy, lopsided wheel.” After coming to this realization during her sophomore year, Ausman found her balance and beat her personal discus record by 19 feet.

Ausman also depends on the nutritional benefits of dairy in her training regimen. She shamelessly sports an overstuffed bag full of whey protein powder containers to ensure access to nutrition after workouts. Before bed, Melissa’s favorite snack is cottage cheese with pears and cinnamon. She also enjoys greek yogurt as a replacement for mayonnaise; one of many gems she has gleaned from her avid Pinterest searching. To Ausman, training in the kitchen and fueling her body properly is another vital spoke in her wheel of life.

What advice does Melissa offer to aspiring athletes? “Whatever effort you are willing to put into your sport, the results will come accordingly,” she said. “No one else is going to give you the drive to be the best.” She also warned against dwelling on setbacks, suggesting that you can’t get stuck in the past if you want to be focused on your future.
Speaking of the future, what do mom and dad think of Melissa’s Olympic aspirations?

“Oh, she’ll get there, I’m sure,” said Frank. “Anytime I have ever doubted her, she has proven me wrong.”

“She gets her mind set on what she wants to do, and that’s what she’s going to do,” said Lyndia. “I’m not going to put off getting a passport.”

Providing Mentorship Today to Develop the Leaders of Tomorrow

dietetic intern

Anne Goetze, our senior director of nutrition affairs, was recently selected as a recipient of the 2016 Preceptor Award by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation. Only seven of these awards are available each year across the entire nation. A preceptor is a professional practitioner who is an exemplary educator, mentor and supervisor to students.

Did you know that the ODNC has an average of eight dietetic interns (future nutrition professionals) from Oregon State University and Oregon Health and Science University each year?  While here, they research the nutritional value of dairy, participate in dairy industry meetings, tour dairy farms and meet industry leaders and partners.anne goetze

“Serving as a preceptor is something all RDNs should do,” said Anne. “Not only is it our professional responsibility, it is a challenge that returns benefits time and again. I truly want each intern to succeed and am delighted to see them become colleagues and leaders as they develop their own careers. Interns bring a fresh perspective to our work, and I have learned so much from them through the years. I’m fortunate to work in an organization that values the education of dietetic interns.”

Anne is a recognized leader in the field of nutrition and dietetics throughout Oregon who has worked for ODNC for more than 25 years. Have questions about the nutritional value of dairy? Contact Anne at agoetze@odncouncil.org or 503-229-5033.

Fifth Generation Dairy Farmers Representing Industry

oregon dairy princess

Since 1959, the Oregon Dairy Princess-Ambassador (DPA) Program has been raising awareness about the dairy industry through classroom presentations, county and state fairs, community events, summer camps, school assemblies and more. The DPAs develop valuable experience with presentations, networking and life skills during their tenure.oregon diary princess

Sara Pierson, daughter of Steve and Susan Pierson of Sar-Ben Farms in St. Paul was crowned the 2016 Oregon Dairy Princess-Ambassador in January. Sara is a fifth generation dairy producer and a sophomore at Oregon State University studying Agricultural Business Management.

Gina Atsma, daughter of Gerald and Nancy Atsma of Atsma Dairy in McMinnville was crowned the 2016 Dairy Princess-Ambassador First Alternate. Gina is also a fifth generation dairy producer and attends Chemeketa Community College with plans to transfer to Oregon State University’s veterinarian program.

Six other DPAs represent Oregon counties including Washington, Linn-Benton, Columbia, Tillamook, Marion and Yamhill. Together, they will provide 135 days of classroom presentations, public appearances, civic engagements, and more throughout the state of Oregon.

The Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council provides financial support, coordination, training and materials to the Dairy Princess-Ambassador program to help raise awareness about dairy nutrition.

RELATED ARTICLE: Dairy Farms Come in All Shapes and Sizes

Delivering Healthy Food and Activity to Schools

FUTP60 and schools

From the cafeteria to the playground, the classroom and in between, dairy has a vital role in schools across Oregon. At the end of June, Crista Hawkins was announced as Director of School Programs for ODNC. In this role, she is responsible for school health and wellness partnerships and programs like Fuel Up to Play 60.

Crista HawkinsFuel Up to Play 60 is an in-school nutrition and physical activity program created by the National Dairy Council and the NFL, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. In Oregon, that program is now well received by hundreds of schools and school districts throughout the state. Recent school activities that ODNC arranged have involved current and past NFL players including Kellen Clemens, Joey Harrington and Anthony Newman.

“All kinds of activities are possible when you eat healthy,” said Crista. “I love working with Fuel Up to Play 60 to inspire wellness.”

Crista has managed Oregon’s additional school efforts including culinary trainings, school wellness awards, farm tours and more. Most recently, she attended the School Nutrition Association national conference in San Antonio, where she presented materials and information about ODNC programs to attendees.

For more information about how to bring Fuel Up to Play 60 into your local schools, contact Crista Hawkins at 971-673-2725.

Federal Dietary Guidelines Recommend Dairy

dary foods

Early this year, the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGAs) were released jointly by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the United States Department of Health and Human Services. Similar to previous versions, the new DGAs recommend three servings of dairy each day as an important part of a healthy eating pattern.

The full report brings attention to the fact that daily dairy intake for most Americans falls below recommendations and calls for increased consumption. Adding one serving of dairy every day can help Americans get the nutrients they need in an easy and affordable way.

Dairy foods are nutrient rich and among the top sources of calcium, vitamin D and potassium, which are nutrients of concern in the American diet. Few other foods deliver dairy’s powerhouse of nutrients in such an affordable, appealing and readily available way. By comparison, it would take 21 cups of chopped broccoli to deliver the same amount of calcium as three glasses of milk.

The DGAs are significant because they form the foundation of all the USDA nutrition programs – school meals, WIC, Head Start, extension and SNAP-Ed. They also impact the nutrition recommendations health professionals give their patients and curriculum in the classroom.

RELATED ARTICLE: Decoding the Dairy Case

Prompting Positive Changes for Community Health

community health

What happens when a broad-based group of citizens comes together with a common goal to improve the health of their community? Change happens!

Just over a year ago, the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council (ODNC) organized a town hall gathering in Tillamook to bring together a diverse group of community leaders who care about health and wellness. This led to the Tillamook County Commission declaring 2016 the “Year of Wellness.”

Anne Goetze, Senior Director of Nutrition Affairs for ODNC, has been serving on their appointed task force and co-chairs the nutrition subcommittee. Additionally, this town hall led to ODNC’s work with the Oregon Department of Education and the Tillamook School District on wellness policy activation with Fuel Up to Play 60 as a featured program.

In August, a well-attended Community Health Matters Forum helped chart the course for ongoing community engagement. Results from an online challenge showed people making healthier food choices, preparing healthy meals and being more physically active every day. The success of this program serves as a model that will be introduced in Umatilla later this year.

For more information about the Year of Wellness efforts, visit their website at http://tillamookcountyhealthmatters.org/about-us/.

Bend Student Represents Oregon at National Summit

Inspired and led by youth, Fuel Up to Play 60 is an in-school nutrition and physical activity program created by the National Dairy Council and the NFL, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, to help encourage today’s youth to lead healthier lives. Funded and managed by the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council, Fuel Up to Play 60 is active in more than 73,000 schools nationwide and hundreds of public schools in Oregon.

futp60-student-national-summit-2016As a young champion of health and wellness, Bend sixth-grader Lily Sweet traveled to Indiana as Oregon’s 2016-2017 Student Ambassador for the national Fuel Up to Play 60 Summit this summer. She attended with students from other states, program advisors and professional athletes from the National Football League. The summit provides leadership, communication and program training to select students who drive the Fuel Up to Play 60 program in their respective schools, communities and states.

At her grade school, Elk Meadow Elementary, Lily promoted events and activities that encouraged her fellow students to eat healthy food and exercise more – like setting up a smoothie booth at school conferences and creating an informational video. “One of my favorite projects that the team and I did was writing and performing our own play to promote wellness,” said Sweet.

Now she is looking to take it to the next level as a new student at Pacific Crest Middle School. “With her track record and the knowledge and experience she gained at the national summit, I’m confident that Lily will accomplish great things,” said Crista Hawkins, Director of School Programs for the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council.

The Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council funds and manages Fuel Up to Play 60 grants, supporting school-wide activities in both physical education and better access to nutrition, including school breakfasts. In the latest round, districts and schools will receive nearly $100,000, reaching hundreds of thousands of students throughout Oregon.

For more information about Fuel up to Play 60, visit www.fueluptoplay60.com.

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