Monthly Archives: February 2017

Mushroom Cheddar Soup

Mushroom Cheese Soup
This cheesy and creamy soup is for you, whether you are lactose intolerant or not.

Serves 9

indulgent-recipeentree-recipe

 

 

Dietitian’s tip: Use either whole milk or lactose-free whole milk. Cheddar cheese, like all aged cheeses, contains very little lactose so you can enjoy without symptoms. For a healthy balance to your meal, accompany this treat with a side salad or roasted vegetables.

Prep time: 10 min   Cook time: 30 min

INGREDIENTS
Sliced baby portabella mushrooms
1 cup yellow onion, peeled, sliced
1 tablespoon garlic, peeled, minced
1 tablespoon vegetable oill
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 cup butter
1/4 cup flour
2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
2 cups lactose-free whole milk
2 cups shredded cheddar

INSTRUCTIONS
In a large sauce pan, sauté mushrooms, onion, and garlic in vegetable oil over medium heat, for 3 to 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

Add butter to pan and melt over medium heat; add flour, stirring constantly for 2 to 3 minutes or until incorporated.

Gradually add chicken broth and milk, stirring until incorporated; bring to a boil over medium-high heat.

Reduce to a simmer over medium-low heat; cook for 10 to 15 minutes or until soup is thickened.

Stir in cheddar cheese and simmer for an additional 3 to 5 minutes or until cheese is melted.

Tip: Soup can be made up to one day in advance, and reheated

NUTRITIONAL FACTS
Per serving: Calories 210, Total Fat 14g 22%, Saturated Fat 7g 35 %, Trans Fat 0g, Cholestrol 35mg 12%, Sodium 290mg 12%, Total Carbohydrate 10g 3%, Dietary Fiber 1g 4%, Sugars 3g

Recipe Courtesy of National Dairy Council®

Harvest Cheddar Tart

Cheddar Apple Pear Tart
Apples, pears and cheese have always been a classic trio. Take them to the next level with this sweet treat.

Serves 6

indulgent-recipeDessert recipe

 

 

Dietitian’s Tip: With an indulgent dessert like this on the menu, plan ahead and enjoy a low calorie and low fat meal first.

Prep time: 5 min   Cook time: 10 min

INGREDIENTS
6 puff pastry shells
1 Bartlett pear, stemmed, cored, chopped
1 red apple, stemmed, cored, chopped
1 tablespoon butter
1/2 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
6 tablespoons (1.5 ounces) aged Cheddar cheese, shredded
6 teaspoons caramel sauce

INSTRUCTIONS
Preheat oven to 350 F degrees

Bake puff pastry shells according to the package directions.

In a medium skillet, cook pear and apple in butter for 5 to 7 minutes or until tender; sprinkle with pumpkin pie spice.

Fill each puff pastry cup with 2 tablespoons fruit; top with 1 tablespoon shredded cheese.

Bake tart for 2 to 3 minutes or until cheese is melted.

Serve tart with 1 teaspoon caramel sauce.

Tip: Classic Cheddar cheese may be substituted in place of aged Cheddar cheese.

NUTRITIONAL FACTS
Per serving: Calories 290, Total Fat 18g 28%, Saturated Fat 6g 30 %, Trans Fat 0g, Cholesterol 15mg 5%, Sodium 290mg 12%, Total Carbohydrate 29g 10%, Dietary Fiber 2g 8%, Sugars 10g, Protein 6g

Recipe Courtesy of National Dairy Council®

21st Century Dairy Farm, 21st Century Dairy Farmer

Milking Robot Dairylain

Today’s modern dairy farm is a far cry from what many people envision. Technology plays a very important role in dairy farming — from caring for cows to caring for natural resources. In Oregon, more and more dairy farmers are installing robotic milking systems for their cows.

With robotic milking systems, the cows are responsible for their own milking. They voluntarily enter a safe and clean stall when they’re ready to be milked — usually two to three times daily. Using an optical camera and lasers, the robot cleans and preps the cow’s udder, attaches and retracts the vacuum milking cups, and treats the udder post-milking to prevent infection. A meter continually monitors such things as milk quality and content or milking intervals — how often a cow comes through the stall.

The system’s software management alerts the farmer if anything is amiss. So if there’s anything abnormal about the milk quality, it’s automatically diverted away from the main milk supply. Or if a cow isn’t following her normal schedule, it may be an indication she’s not feeling well and the farmer is alerted. It’s real-time insight to each cow, individually. The cows also respond exceptionally well to the predictability and routine of the robots.

Robotics is just one of many ways that modern dairy farmers are evolving. Dairy farms across Oregon are already using RFID ear tags to monitor herd health, in addition to automated feeders, solar panels, methane digesters, GPS driven tractors, observation drones, computerized irrigation and much more. Technology is used not only to help make dairy farmers more efficient, but also to better care for their cows, the environment and their communities.

You can read more about robotic milking systems at two Oregon dairies in these recent headlines:

Mechanized milking
Local dairy goes high-tech with robotic upgrade

The Argus Observer
Dairylain Farms | The Chamberlain Family | Vale, OR

Tilla-Bay Farms celebrates five years as a robotic dairy with open house
Tillamook Headlight Herald
Tilla-Bay Farms, Inc | The Mizee Family | Tillamook, OR
Full text of the article available here for those without a subscription.