Monthly Archives: June 2017

Starting the Day out Right with School Breakfast

Imlay students are Fueled Up

Students at Imlay Elementary in Hillsboro, Oregon are starting the day out right with school breakfast thanks to the support of Fuel Up to Play 60 and the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council.

Knowing the importance of breakfast for student success motivated the Fuel Up to Play 60 team at Imlay Elementary to apply for grant funding through the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council. Funds brought new life to the cafeteria space with a fresh coat of paint, new menu boards, sound system and posters.

Imlay held a special Fuel Up to Play 60 kick off assembly to highlight all their cafeteria improvements. Teachers encouraged hungry students to participate in “Grab and Go” breakfast and used breakfast time as an opportunity to teach students about “What is a Healthy Breakfast.”

Classes have been fueling their minds and bodies with a friendly competition for the highest breakfast participation. “The student wellness team is helping serve food and participating in taste testing, gathering breakfast participation data and making wellness announcements,” said first grade teacher Lisa Sagapolu.

Fuel Up to Play 60 is the largest school nutrition and physical activity program in the country. The program is administered locally by the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council, in partnership with the National Football League, U.S. Department of Agriculture and the National Dairy Council.

Two Great Ways You Can Enjoy the Milk Carton Boat Race

MILK CARTON BOAT RACE
Date:
June 25, 2017
Time:
11:00 am activities begin (boat check-in opens at 9:30 am)
Location:
Westmoreland Park Casting Pond – SE McLoughlin Blvd and Bybee Blvd
Cost:
FREE

At the Royal Rosarians’ Milk Carton Boat Race, teams and individuals race each other across a pond floating atop empty milk jugs and cartons. It’s a unique Portland Rose Festival tradition dating back to 1973. You have to see it to believe it – and you’re invited to do just that.

Here are two ways for you to be a part of this year’s party on the pond:


PARTICIPATE

It is 100% free to register as a participant in the Milk Carton Boat Race. Here are five simple steps to join the race:

1. Read the Race Information and Rules.

2. Give your boat a name and Register Online.

3. Design and build your boat. Watch this video for some helpful tips. Keep in mind that a one gallon jug
supports 8 lbs., a half-gallon supports 4 lbs., and a one-quart paper carton floats 2 lbs.

4. Have all boat riders sign a Waiver.

5. On race day bring your boat, waivers, life jackets and enthusiasm. Check in and boat inspection opens at 9:30 am. Onsite registration is also available from 9:30-10:30 am.

There are multiple divisions for teams and individuals, and children as young as 7 years old can participate. No experience is needed, and every year there have been first-timers. The pond is relatively shallow, and volunteers from the Sea Scouts will be present to help ensure water safety.


SPECTATE

While it’s a lot of fun to participate in the races, it can also be a lot of fun to watch. There’s no cost to attend the event and cheer on your favorite boats and racers. There will be food available for purchase, as well as samples and giveaways.

Seating around the park is first-come, first-served, and you can bring chairs or blankets to make yourself comfortable. Don’t forget your sunglasses and sunscreen!

The Milk Carton Boat Race is produced by the Royal Rosarians, sanctioned by the Portland Rose Festival and sponsored by the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council.

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Improving School Meals for Oregon Students

Clear Lake kick off school lunch

by DeDe Poynor, Oregon State University Dietetic Intern

Deanna PoynorDid you know school meals have been getting a makeover? It’s true – a lot has changed since the National School Lunch Program began in 1946. Here are some examples.

Current federal requirements help students eat a well-balanced diet with the nutrients they need as they grow. Schools must offer a variety of fruits and vegetables throughout the week. They also give students whole grains, lean proteins, and dairy products. Including more of the good stuff and cutting excessive salt, sugar, fat and calories helps develop healthy eating habits now and in the future.

Another role of school meals is to address child hunger. Oregon is the sixth most food insecure state in the country, with 1 in 6 households unsure of where their next meal will come from. Those kids often do not get the nutrients they need to be healthy and succeed in the classroom. Due to this, many schools around the state are looking at options outside of lunch, including breakfast and summer meal programs, to get students the food they need.

As the name implies, federal meal requirements must be met. However, deciding what to offer and how to prepare the food is up to the schools. It can be hard to find recipes and items that meet federal requirements. It is also hard to find menu items that most of the kids will eat. That is why Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council and Oregon Department of Education Child Nutrition Programs have joined forces to offer statewide culinary trainings for school nutrition staff. These trainings give tips and tools for offering things that kids will like, including local fruits and vegetables.

Oregon has been a national leader for the Farm to School Program, connecting Oregon schools with local farmers. With funding provided by the state legislature, this program has given kids opportunities to try locally grown and processed fruits and vegetables, as well as meat, dairy and whole grains. At the same time, the Farm to School Program has helped the economy by supporting Oregon businesses.

School meal programs continue to evolve with the support of students, teachers, administrators, parents and communities. School nutrition staff are bringing creative solutions to kitchens and cafeterias that maximize the available funding while keeping Oregon children full with nutritious and delicious foods.

Is DASH the Best Diet … Ever?

Could it be? Is there really a “best diet?” If such a thing exists, the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan may just be it. In 2017, for the seventh year in a row, an expert panel of health and nutrition experts assembled by U.S. News & World Report rated DASH Best Overall Diet.

DASH has been repeatedly lauded by expert panels for its proven plan for healthy eating, diabetes prevention and heart health. With nearly 20 years of research to support it, the DASH Diet is recommended by both the 2010 and 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

What’s unique about DASH is that it is really not a traditional diet but rather an eating plan that you can follow for life. It also works well for families, couples, co-workers and individuals. The focus is on food – simple, easy-to-prepare and tasty food. No pills or special ingredients. Simply food.

The DASH eating plan emphasizes whole grains, vegetables, fruits, lean protein and dairy foods. In fact, milk, cheese and yogurt are critical components of DASH because of the nutrients they provide. This combination of foods provides enhanced health benefits that are not seen when dairy foods are not included.

DASH was originally shown to be as effective in treating high blood pressure for some people as medications can be. Further research has confirmed this time and again, but also has shown that DASH can help reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes while at the same time improving bone health. A 2016 study showed that a modified DASH diet with full fat dairy foods, no juice and fewer sugars maintained and enhanced the health benefits of DASH, including:

  • Similar benefit of lowering blood pressure
  • Reduced blood triglyceride levels
  • No difference in total LDL cholesterol
  • Did not reduce the blood HDL cholesterol levels

So, is it time for you to get started with the DASH eating plan? We can help with the information and tools you need. Visit https://odncouncil.org/dash/ to find DASH recipes to help you reach your daily goal for each food group.

 

 


READ MORE ABOUT DASH:

Bean and Smoked Cheddar Salad

Bean and Smoked Cheddar Salad
This tasty bean salad comes together in no time, and the smokey cheddar adds bonus flavor. No smoked cheddar? Try using sharp cheddar or pepper jack.

Serves 4

dash-recipehealthy-recipeentree-recipeSide dish recipe

 

 

Dietitian’s Tip: Build a DASH meal with this salad by adding a side of fresh fruit and a whole grain roll

INGREDIENTS
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
¼ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon sugar
¼ teaspoon black pepper
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
¼ cup red onion, minced
½ cup celery, sliced
2 15-ounce can 50% less sodium beans (garbanzo, kidney or black), drained and rinsed
4 ounces smoked Cheddar cheese, cut into ¼ inch cubes

INSTRUCTIONS
In a large bowl combine Dijon mustard, cider vinegar, salt, sugar, black pepper and olive oil: whisk until well mixed.
Add remaining ingredients to large bowl with vinaigrette and mix until evenly coated. Serve chilled or at room temperature.

NUTRITIONAL FACTS
Per serving: 240 Calories, 11 g total fat, 4 g saturated fat, 310 mg sodium, 23 g carbohydrates, 8 g fiber, 12 g protein, 192 mg calcium

Milk Builds Strong Schools in Oregon

MLK School Jacksons_2017

Remember those old videos of Ed Sullivan introducing the Beatles? Well, it wasn’t quite that boisterous when the students of Martin Luther King K-8 School in Portland learned that they were selected to receive a brand new iPad Learning Lab. But it was close.

The donation was made possible through a charitable Jacksons Food Stores program called “Milk Builds Strong Schools,” which set aside five percent of milk gallon sales in stores throughout Oregon from October 21, 2016 to January 5, 2017. The program is supported by Dairy Farmers of Washington, Darigold and Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council.

The Learning Lab includes 10 new iPad Pro devices with Apple Pencils and a mobile cart that can store, charge, and sync up to 30 iPad devices. This was the second year a school in Oregon was selected, the fourth year for schools in Washington and the first year ever for schools in Utah and Idaho. Martin Luther King K-8 was randomly selected in a drawing of all public schools in Oregon.

“Our partnership with the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council allowed us to create a campaign that benefits an Oregon school and promotes education through technology,” said Cory Jackson, president of Jacksons Food Stores.

Kiara Single, Oregon Dairy Princess Ambassador, participated in the assembly and helped with the big announcement. She shared some facts about dairy farming in Oregon with students, and said it was fitting that milk made the donation possible since this year marks the 20th anniversary of milk as Oregon’s Official State Beverage.

Adopt a Farmer Program Includes Oregon Dairies

Each year, Oregon dairy farmers participate in a program called Adopt a Farmer through Oregon Aglink to help promote agriculture through educating middle school students. Five Oregon dairy farm families are currently participating in this year’s program giving students the opportunity to experience a dairy farm firsthand.

The five dairies include:

  • Harrold’s Dairy in Creswell
  • Cloud Cap Farms in Boring
  • Mayfield Dairy in Aurora
  • Veeman’s Dairy in St. Paul
  • Willamette Valley Cheese in Salem

In addition to offering tours of their farms, these dairy farmers visit their adoptive classroom two to three times throughout the school year to engage students in the science behind farming. They participate in activities related to soil, water, conservation, irrigation, genetics, the farm-to-table continuum and economics.

Learn more about one of Oregon’s dairy farmers, Melissa Collman of Cloud Cap Farms and her participation in the program.

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RELATED LINKS:

Adopt a Farmer

Dairy Meets Classroom: Melissa Collman of Cloud Cap Farms

Cloud Cap Dairy, Boring, OR

Cloud Cap Dairy on Facebook

Cloud Cap Dairy on Twitter

Cloud Cap Dairy on Instagram