Monthly Archives: November 2017

Advancing Health, Wellness and Education in Rogue Valley

Improving student performance and advancing a culture of health and wellness were the primary themes discussed at the Learning Connection Summit at Central Point Elementary School on October 26.

Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council staff took a lead role in bringing together a broad spectrum of community leaders from the private and public sectors to come together and strengthen local networks, stimulate action and support the link between health and education. Discussions included school and worksite wellness, community nutrition, physical activity and school nutrition innovations.

“Advancing a culture of wellness in the Rogue Valley will help improve student achievement and contribute to the vitality and health of our region,” said Cheryl Kirk, Nutrition Instructor for Family and Community Health/SNAP-Ed, Oregon State University Extension. “This will help get our community thinking about what we can all do as individuals and collectively to make a positive difference.”

Summit participants came from both Jackson and Josephine counties and included elected officials, superintendents, school nutrition directors, county staff, health system administrators, business leaders and local farmers. All committed to advance school and community wellness with time and resources over the next year and beyond.

This effort was originally prompted by registered dietitian nutritionists from the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council. Two years ago, the Council organized a similar gathering in Tillamook. This led to the Tillamook County Commission declaring a “Year of Wellness,” yielding positive changes in individuals, businesses, schools and organizations. Following on that success, Umatilla followed suit with a summit of their own.

In addition to the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council, the Rogue Valley Learning Connection Summit was supported by Central Point School District, Oregon State University Extension, AllCare Health, Rogue Creamery, and Oregon Department of Education, Child Nutrition Programs.

Oregon’s Newest Creamery Invites You to the Farm

A new farm-to-table experience is coming soon, where you’ll be able to meet the cows that make the milk for your artisan cheese and watch skilled cheesemakers in action.

TMK Farm and Creamery is located about a half hour from Portland in Canby, Oregon. It is a small family farm that began 30 years ago when owner Todd Koch purchased his first Holstein cow. “It all started with a 4-H project that went too far,” he said. “I was supposed to sell that cow, but I kept her and the rest is history.”

By 1997, the milking herd had grown, so the Koch family built TMK Dairy. This year, they built a commercial creamery where Koch’s sister Shauna and brother-in-law Bert Garza began making farmstead cheeses.

As described on the farm’s website, the new state-of-the-art creamery on the dairy property “allows for an immersive experience for their guests that provides a transparent look at farmstead cheese-making, lets you meet the cows [and] explore the farm.”

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While the herd of 20 cows is relatively small by comparison to other Oregon dairies, like dairy farms of all sizes, TMK demonstrates great care and stewardship for their animals, natural resources, employees and their community.

The creamery is already operating, selling mostly to local stores and restaurants/wineries, with plans to open a boutique tasting room, store and patio on the site of the creamery where you can sample artisan cheese while watching the cheesemakers through large observation windows.

Currently, farm tours are offered any day of the week by appointment. You can check out more from TMK by visiting their Facebook page @TMKfarms, web page www.tmkfarms.com or by calling 503-705-2550.

Stacy Foster Selected to Manage Oregon Dairy Industry Relations

With more than a decade of experience leading farm tours for thousands of students, teachers and parents at a nationally recognized Oregon dairy, Stacy Foster knows a thing or two about dairy farming. That background will serve her well as the new Industry Relations and Communications Manager for the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council.

In this position, Foster will serve as the primary liaison with Oregon’s dairy industry and affiliated agricultural organizations. Working with Oregon’s dairy farm families, industry leaders and others, she will promote the growth and advancement of the dairy industry in the state and surrounding region. Foster succeeds Melinda Petersen, who joined Dairy West in Meridian, Idaho, as Producer and Community Relations Manager.

Foster was selected through a competitive recruitment process. In addition to possessing a strong dairy background, she has a degree in communications from Corban University and is an experienced homeschool instructor. She created the tour program for Rickreall Dairy from the ground up and recently began offering fall tours in addition to her spring visits.

“After leading farm tours for the past 10 years, I have discovered a passion for Oregon’s dairy industry and the families that make this community thrive,” said Foster. “I look forward to working together to continue building on positive messages about dairy farming and its products.”

Foster was recently honored by the Oregon Department of Agriculture as a recipient of the Farm to School Award. The award recognizes individuals and organizations that go ‘above and beyond to strengthen the relationship between kids, schools and food that’s being locally produced.’ Amy Gilroy, Farm to School Manager, presented the award to Foster on the steps of the Oregon State Capitol at a public event called Oregon’s Bounty in October. Earlier this year, Rickreall Dairy also won the U.S. Dairy Sustainability Award.

“We are very excited to have Stacy working for dairy in Oregon,” said Pete Kent, Executive Director for the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council. “She brings a strong skill set to the table and possesses a vision and commitment to serve Oregon’s dairy farm families.”

What’s in a Waldorf Salad? Watch this Video and Find Out!

No better time than apple season to indulge in this DASH friendly Waldorf Salad

Serves 6

dash-recipehealthy-recipeSide dish recipe

 

 

Dietitian’s Tip: This recipe uses fat free yogurt in place of mayonnaise to reduce fat and boost nutrient content. The toasted walnuts, celery, raisins and dressing compliment the tartness of the apples. To put together a complete DASH friendly meal, enjoy this salad with:

  • A whole wheat grilled cheese sandwich
  • A whole wheat roll with a glass of milk
  • Whole wheat crackers with cheese

INGREDIENTS
1⁄3 cup walnuts, chopped
2 apples, cored and diced
1 cup celery, diced
1⁄2 cup raisins
1⁄4 cup fat free plain yogurt
1⁄2 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon lemon juice

 

INSTRUCTIONS
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Place chopped walnuts on a baking sheet and bake for 12-15 minutes. Stir occasionally until they are evenly toasted.

Combine apples, celery, nuts, and raisins.

Stir together yogurt, sugar, and lemon juice. Pour over apple mixture and toss lightly.

Refrigerate leftovers within 2 hours.

 

NUTRITIONAL FACTS
Per serving: 120 calories, 4.5 g total fat, 0 g saturated fat, 21 g carbohydrate, 2 g protein, 3 g fiber, 20 mg sodium, 40 mg calcium

 

RECIPE COURTESY OF: Food Hero