Monthly Archives: December 2017

White Chicken Chili

Try this delicious, hearty chili on a cold, wintery day or any day.

Serves 8

dash-recipehealthy-recipeentree-recipe

 

 

Dietitian’s Tip: To help you meet your DASH daily goals, here are suggestions for foods to eat with this hearty chili:

  • Whole grain crackers or a slice of whole grain bread
  • Salad with leafy greens, carrots, cucumbers, and a sprinkle of nuts and a drizzle of olive oil
  • For a simple dessert or snack later on, choose fruit.

INGREDIENTS
1 tablespoon oil
1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into bite-sized pieces
1 onion, chopped
1 ½ teaspoons garlic powder or 6 cloves garlic
2 cans (15.5 ounces each) white beans, rinsed and drained
1 can (14.5 ounces) chicken broth
2 cans (4 ounces each) chopped mild green chilies
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon dried oregano leaves
½ teaspoon pepper
¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 cup (8 ounces) nonfat sour cream
½ cup nonfat or 1% milk

 

INSTRUCTIONS

Heat oil in a large saucepan. Sauté chicken, onion and garlic powder until chicken is no longer pink inside.

Add the beans, broth, chilies, and seasonings.

Bring to a boil. Reduce heat. Simmer uncovered for 30 minutes.

Remove from the heat. Stir in sour cream and milk.

Refrigerate leftovers within 2 hours.

 

NUTRITIONAL FACTS
Per serving: 260 calories, 4.5 g total fat, 1 g saturated fat, 40 g carbohydrate, 23 g protein, 6 g fiber, 220 mg sodium, 855 mg potassium, 86 mg magnesium, 175 mg calcium

 

Recipe courtesy of Food Hero


RELATED ARTICLE

DASH into the New Year for a Healthier You

by Josie Oleson, Oregon Health & Science University Dietetic Intern

Having trouble setting a New Year’s resolution? Why not DASH into 2018 by eating better and working toward a healthier you?

Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, or DASH, emphasizes dairy, fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean protein as part of a balanced diet to reduce high blood pressure and improve health. Cheese, milk, and yogurt provide essential nutrients like calcium, potassium and magnesium that are key in making the DASH diet work.

For eight years, DASH has been ranked the Best Diet Overall diet by U.S. News and World Report. In 2018, the eating plan also topped the “healthy eating” and “heart disease prevention” categories.

The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association recently lowered the recommendations for what it means to have high blood pressure. This change will increase the number of people with elevated or high blood pressure, but this also means that people will be able to fight back sooner by changing their diet and getting more exercise. This is what the DASH diet was originally designed to do, but it’s also a healthy way of eating that is recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Want to kick-start your DASH resolution?

Take the Rate Your Plate Quiz and get started with this 4-step plan.


Try this new DASH recipe – White Chicken Chili

 

 

 

 


Find more recipes.

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Oregon Dairy Farms Milking Energy from the Sun

Steve Pierson of Sar-Ben Farms

For Steve Pierson of Sar-Ben Farms in St. Paul, Oregon, any project that is good for the environment and good for his bottom line generally is a go. That said, when the opportunity arose to install solar panels on his 300-cow dairy, Pierson didn’t hesitate.

Today Sar-Ben’s milking parlor and irrigation systems are powered by the sun.

“From a business perspective and an environmental perspective, solar panels make a lot of sense,” Pierson said.

Across the state in Vale, Oregon, where sunny days are the norm, Warren Chamberlain of Dairylain Farms also found that solar panels could help him meet his power needs in an environmentally friendly manner. Today, after five years of enjoying reduced energy costs, he’s a firm believer in the power of the sun.

Warren Chamberlain of Dairylain Farms

“As dairy farmers, we do whatever we can to protect the environment,” he said, “and because we have a lot of sun over here on the east side of the state, solar panels just seemed like a natural fit.”

Between solar panels and methane digesters that convert cow waste into renewable energy, dairy farmers are providing a significant boost to Oregon’s renewable power supply, according to Energy Trust of Oregon.

About one-fourth of dairy waste from Oregon’s 228 dairies is converted to renewable power through methane digesters, according to Energy Trust of Oregon. And many operations are now turning to solar panels.

Melissa Collman of Cloud Cap Farms, a 200-cow dairy in Boring, Oregon, looked at installing solar panels for seven years before making the move in the spring of 2017. “For years, we thought it would be a great addition to the dairy,” Collman said, “but we never went through with it because of the cost and complexity of it.”

“All farmers are environmentalists at heart.”

When a company approached the dairy with an offer to install the solar panels and even rent the land they are sited on, Cloud Cap made the change. Cloud Cap won’t have access to the power generated by the panels for the first 15 years, but the benefits apparently are worth the wait. “At that point, once we take ownership of them, it should completely power the dairy,” Collman said.

Melissa Collman of Cloud-Cap Farms

Cloud Cap’s deal is one of many that dairy farmers have used to purchase solar systems. Many have utilized state and federal renewable energy grants to help defray some of the upfront costs.

Depending on the formula and the amount of kilowatts a system generates, the systems can pay for themselves in a relatively short period. Pierson of Sar-Ben Farms, for example, said the three ten kilowatt systems he installed will pay for themselves within four years. A more typical payback period is the seven years that Bouke deHoop of Holland’s Dairy in Klamath Falls estimates it will take for him to recoup his investment in solar.

Systems typically are installed on less productive farmland, and, according to Chamberlain of Dairylain, don’t take up much land to begin with. The two ten kilowatt systems on his farm run about 100 feet in length, he said.

Systems are relatively maintenance free after the installation, Chamberlain said. “All we have to do is wash the dust off during the summer a little bit and knock the snow off during the winter,” he said. “Other than that, we haven’t had to do anything to them. They just sit out there and produce electricity for me.”

Bouke deHoop of Holland’s Dairy

Most solar systems won’t power an entire operation, but are designed to supply a portion of a farm’s energy needs. That portion, however, can be significant. Chamberlain said that over the five years he’s run on solar power, he has saved about $35,000 in electricity costs, or about $7,000 a year.

Beyond that, Chamberlain noted, he’s also been reducing his carbon footprint, which is something he and other dairy farmers take pride in. “Anytime you are able to save money and do something that is good for the environment, it always makes you feel good,” he said.

“I think farmers are always looking for ways to be more sustainable,” said Collman of Cloud Cap Farms.

Pierson of Sar-Ben Farms agreed: “All farmers are environmentalists at heart. This is just one more way we help protect our environment. We use renewable resources whenever possible.”

White Chocolate Mint Whoopie Pies

I’m Dreaming of a White … Chocolate Mint Whoopie Pie.

These cookies are ‘mint’ to be for parties, gift baskets or a fun baking project with your kids during the holiday season. Try one bite, and you’ll be saying “whoopee” for whoopie pies.

Makes 2 dozen whoopie pies

indulgent-recipeDessert recipe

INGREDIENTS
Chocolate Cookies:

2 cups all-purpose flour
½ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1 ½ teaspoons baking soda
½ teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
1 cup granulated sugar
½ cup butter, softened
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 large egg
1 cup milk

White Chocolate Mint Buttercream Filling:
2 ounces chopped white chocolate
5 tablespoons heavy cream, divided
½ cup butter, softened
3 ¾ cups (1 1-pound box) powdered sugar
1 teaspoon pure mint extract (or peppermint extract)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/8 teaspoon salt
10 peppermint candies, crushed into fine pieces

INSTRUCTIONS

Preheat oven to 375˚. Line baking sheets with parchment paper.

For Cookies:

Combine flour, cocoa, baking soda, baking powder, and salt in medium bowl; set aside.

Beat together sugar, butter, vanilla and egg in large bowl with electric mixer on medium speed until well combined. Stir in milk. Gradually beat in flour mixture on low speed.

Drop batter by rounded tablespoonfuls 2 inches apart onto prepared baking sheets.

Bake until edges appear set, 7 to 9 minutes. Cool on pan 1 minute. Remove to wire rack and cool completely.

For White Chocolate Mint Buttercream Filling:

Combine white chocolate and 3 tablespoons cream in microwave-safe bowl. Heat for one minute at medium (50%) power, stirring at 30-second intervals until melted and smooth. Cool to room temperature.

Beat butter in large bowl with electric mixer on medium speed until creamy. Gradually beat in powdered sugar, the remaining 2 tablespoons heavy cream, mint extract, vanilla and salt on low speed until blended.

To assemble, spread the bottom sides of half the cookies with the White Chocolate Mint Buttercream Filling. Top with the remaining cookies, bottom sides down; press gently together. Sprinkle the edges of the buttercream with crushed peppermint candies.

Recipe submitted to Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council by Edwina Gadsby