Author Archives: sguirlodncouncil

Dairy and Strawberry Summer Dishes

Rise and shine, it’s berry picking time! If there’s anything that goes well with dairy, it’s a freshly-picked, red, ripe strawberry. In honor of strawberry season, we’ve decided to highlight our favorite strawberry and dairy combinations. Check out more delicious dairy recipes at gonnaneedmilk.com and strawberry recipes from our friends at Oregon Strawberries.

This delicious Strawberry Ricotta Cake has us longing for brunches outside in the summer breeze.

Need to spice up your chicken dinner? Check out this Strawberry Balsamic Mozzarella Chicken – tart strawberries are the perfect combination for balsamic with bite and creamy mozzarella cheese.

We can see this Doughnut Strawberry Shortcake with Bourbon Whipped Cream as the perfect campfire treat after a long hike on the trail.

After this year, we’ve realized that we need more Feta in our lives. For a fresh take, try this Whipped Feta Dip with Strawberry-Basil Relish. Delish!

Looking for more recipes with fresh, local Oregon foods and healthy dairy products? Check out these sites for more inspiration:

GonnaNeedMilk.com

US Dairy Recipes

Oregon Berries

Oregon Strawberries

Oregon Blueberries

A Small Oregon Creamery Thinks Big with Sustainability

Rogue Creamery, a small Southern Oregon artisan creamery internationally known for its award-winning handcrafted cheeses, is taking home a new recognition during June Dairy Month, by receiving the U.S. Dairy Sustainability Award for Outstanding Dairy Processing and Manufacturing.

A selection of Rogue Creamery’s cheeses.

In October 2019, Rogue Creamery was rewarded for its high standards as the first-ever American cheesemaker to be named Grand Champion at the World Cheese Awards. But owner David Gremmels’ commitment to excellence extends far beyond cheesemaking to business practices that create a culture around doing the right thing.

“The food industry is a challenging environment with an ever-changing landscape. It takes passion, energy, awareness of food safety and a high level of professional business skills to understand, create and adapt,” said Cathy Strange, Vice President of Specialty, Product Development and Innovation at Whole Foods Market. “My experiences with Rogue Creamery and their owners and employees is that they are committed to represent themselves, the dairy community and United States artisan cheesemakers at the highest level.”

Founder of Rogue Creamery, David Gremmels, with cows in his pasture.

The sustainability awards program is managed by the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy, which was established under the leadership of dairy farmers and dairy companies. For 10 years, award recipients have been recognized for their commitment to dairy sustainability with nearly 80 winners and from more than 270 nominees.

This is the fourth recognition for Oregon’s dairy community since 2017. Rogue Creamery joins Rickreall Dairy (2017), Tillamook Creamery (2018), and Threemile Canyon Farms (2020) in exemplifying award winning sustainability efforts.

The heifer barn at Rogue Creamery’s dairy.

Rogue Creamery became Oregon’s first certified B Corporation in 2014, inspiring other like-minded businesses to follow suit and pursue this rigorous certification. And since 2017, it has consistently ranked in the top 10% of B Corps worldwide for its impact on people and planet. This recognition affirms Rogue Creamery as a force for good—balancing purpose with profit and considering the broader, community-wide impact of every business decision.

As a leading proponent of renewable energy and waste reduction, Rogue Creamery has installed solar panels, reduced packaging waste, and created an employee commuter program. And, through team volunteer days, giving campaigns, sponsorships and food drives, Rogue Creamery advances core goals, which include alleviating hunger, increasing access to education, and building awareness about sustainable agriculture. Its “Cheese is Love” campaign has resulted in more than 3,500 pounds of cheese donations for those who have been impacted by fires that ravaged Southern Oregon in September 2020.

The team in front of Rogue Creamery’s marketplace in Central Point, Oregon.

“Oregon’s dairy community has long embraced the importance of sustainability,” said Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council’s Executive Director, Pete Kent. “Dairy farms, co-ops and companies recognize that their businesses can be used to exemplify sustainable choices. We are proud to have Rogue Creamery represent Oregon on the national stage this year as a standard for these efforts.”

This small creamery’s commitment to quality, sustainability and doing the right thing has substantial, sustainable impacts within its local community and beyond – enlightening partners, neighbors, and customers worldwide.

Take A Hike – But Don’t Forget the Cheese!

With warm weather and re-opened trails beckoning to hikers and outdoor enthusiasts, packing up nutritious snacks and meals to take along is important. Cheese is the perfect high-protein food to throw in your backpack. With the array of hike-friendly cheeses available, even the most discerning hiker will have options to choose from.

What kind of cheese should I bring on my hike?

The next time you pack your backpack for a hike, avoid taking soft cheeses (brie, goat cheese or cream cheeses) and go for hard and dry cheeses like Cheddar, Parmesan and Gouda. Avoid shredding your cheese or cutting it into chunks before hiking as it speeds up the aging process and provides more chance of getting contaminated by bacteria.

How should I store my cheese?

Store your cheese in parchment paper while traveling, the porous surface allows cheese to breathe and helps in retaining it’s flavor. Replace your wrap frequently to reduce “sweating” (the process of butterfat separating from the cheese). And don’t forget to store cheese away from hot locations in your backpack and direct sun exposure.

Here’s a list of some popular dry and hard cheeses you can take with you in your backpack:

  • Cheddar
  • Parmesan
  • Parmigiano Reggiano
  • Gouda cheese
  • Cojita
  • Gruyère cheese
  • Pecorino Romano
  • Colby
  • Colby-Jack
  • Manchego
  • Monterey Jack
  • Edam
  • Emmental
  • Comté cheese

How do I keep cheese fresh?

A good habit to get into at home and on the trail, is to write down the date you initially stored your cheese on it’s storage container. This helps you to measure when your cheese may be past it’s prime. And if you’re backpacking for several days – keep your cheese in one block. Cutting it into pieces increases the surface area that can get contaminated by mold and bacteria.

How can you tell if your cheese is past it’s prime?

Always adhere to the 2 Hour Rule for leaving perishables out: After being in room temperature for 2 hours, always re-refrigerate hard cheeses and throw out soft cheeses.

Where can I hike with my cheese?

Anywhere! Check out Tillamook County Wellness and Travel Oregon for more ideas on hiking trails, beaches and scenic areas to visit.

Child Nutrition Culinary Workshop

Welcome to the first-ever, virtual culinary experience with Chef Jessica!  Sponsored by ODE and ODNC, school and child nutrition professionals across Oregon are invited to watch or cook along with Jessica as she prepares easy, tasty and fun recipes that meet Child Nutrition Program guidelines.

Participants receive tips for shaking up old recipes with new flavors and ideas to keep kids coming back for more.


After viewing the webinar, please complete the evaluation survey to help us meet your needs with future trainings:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/Y288PZ2

While supplies last, all participants who complete the evaluation survey will receive an “Undeniably Dairy” apron, as worn by Chef Jessica (with three front pockets) and a handy portable milk cooler for your organization. 


The links referenced in the recording are:

https://www.foodhero.org/kids-taste

Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child framework of wellness

https://theicn.org/icn-resources-a-z/usda-standardized-recipes

https://foodhero.org/recipes/recipe-categories/cooking-crowd

https://healthyschoolrecipes.com/

https://odncouncil.org/schools


For more information on culinary trainings, check out Nourish Myself…Thyme for Me Webinar recording with Dayle Hayes and Chef Brenda Wattles (Certificate of Completion available).

Statewide culinary trainings and this event are sponsored by the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council and the Oregon Department of Education, Child Nutrition Services. Questions? Please contact Crista Hawkins: chawkins@odncouncil.org

RELATED LINKS:

STUDENTS CONNECT WITH SCHOOL NUTRITION PROFESSIONALS (VIDEO)

SCORE BIG WITH SCHOOL BREAKFAST!

WHAT WILL THE SCHOOL LUNCH OF THE FUTURE LOOK LIKE?

Dairy cows: The Olympians of Oregon Milk

Dairy cows as Olympians? You’ve probably never thought of dairy cows as athletes, but there are many similarities.

Dairy cows eat like champions every day. Their bodies work hard to provide nutritious, high-quality milk. Like Olympians who train hard every day, cows they need to fuel themselves with healthy food choices.

Their personal chefs (aka Oregon dairy farmers) provide nutritious and delicious meals for them by working with animal nutritionists to create balanced meals that contain the right amount of protein, energy, fiber, vitamins and minerals for the cow to maintain optimum health.

A balanced meal for cows contains:

  • Corn Silage: the entire corn plant that is chopped and fermented
  • Haylage: grass that is chopped and fermented
  • Hay: a dried grass or legume, often cut and baled
  • Cotton Seed: a by-product of cotton production that is left after the soft cotton is harvested for clothing
  • Distillers Grain: a by-product that is a dried mash produced after the sugar and starch are used in ethanol and fermented beverage production
  • Soybean Meal: a by-product of soybean oil production, sometimes pelleted for animal feed use

Some of these foods would have been sent to the landfill if cows didn’t eat them.

In fact, 75% of a dairy cow’s diet contains items humans can’t eat.

Cows bodies expend a lot of calories creating milk, so they don’t need to go out for a run or long walk like we do. Cows do need rest though, so they lie down about 12-14 hours a day!

Farmers use a version of Fitbit to track how active cows are to ensure they stay healthy and fit. It usually goes on the cow’s ear (as in the photo above) or around their neck or ankle. Dairy farmers can also use a type of technology to measure the cows’ food intake. If the cow isn’t eating the proper nutrients, the farmer is flagged to take the cow’s temperature and do an overall checkup.

Just like elite athletes, cows only receive treatment for specific illnesses.

Specifically, antibiotics are only used if a cow has a diagnosed infection and other treatments have not worked. The milk produced while the cow is receiving antibiotics is discarded. And just like athletes, a cow’s milk is tested for presence of drugs and other substances that should not be present! The milk is prevented from going into the milk supply and cannot be bottled for consumption.

Holstein (left) and Jersey (right) cows are the most common dairy cows in Oregon and produce a lot of milk. And they do this without being treated with hormones. Oregon dairy farmers care for their animals every day of the year. They are so good at taking care of their mooing athletes that the cows naturally produce our favorite 13 essential nutrients in a powerhouse drink: MILK!

Cow’s milk is safe and nutritious no matter what fat content level you prefer to enjoy as an athlete or to serve your family.

So, the next time you go to the grocery store, visit the dairy cooler! And remember the elite athletic team across the state of Oregon that provide nutritious dairy foods for you naturally each day!

Delicious Dairy Treats for Mother’s Day

With Mother’s Day just around the corner, we have a sweet way to show the moms in your life how much you love them.

Try some of our favorite sweet breakfast and brunch recipes including a number from our friends at Go Bold with Butter. They’re perfect for this Sunday – or any day you want to show someone you care!

Looking for something calming and soothing?  Try these Moon Milk recipes that use ground cardamom, ginger and nutmeg to help promote restful sleep- something that all moms could use a little more of!

Local cheesemakers Face Rock Creamery and Rogue Creamery are offering cheese boxes to celebrate Mom’s special day.  Loaded with local flavor, like Jacobsen Co. Honey Sticks and chocolate truffles, they’re sure to make this Mother’s Day a stand out.

You can’t go wrong with flowers… especially if they’re mixed with Salt n Straw’s delicious ice cream!  Their Eat Your Flowers Pint Series ships across the US and features the vivid and aromatic tastes of Jasmine, Hibiscus and Wildflower.  

On that note, jewels don’t hurt either.  Try the in-store Jewels and Gems Menu at Ruby Jewel and treat your Mom to specially made indulgent ice cream sandwiches with decadent flavor combinations like Strawberry Rhubarb and Malted Milk.

The best gift of all?  Time with your Mom.  However you spend this Mother’s Day, by Zoom, phone or in-person, we hope it’s filled with delicious memories!

Related Articles:

EIGHT QUESTIONS FOR AN OREGON DAIRY MOM

MEET SIX WOMEN MAKING A DIFFERENCE IN DAIRY FARMING

NINE REASONS TO ENJOY REAL MILK IN YOUR HANDCRAFTED COFFEE DRINK

Dairy Plays an Essential Role in Sustainable Food Systems

From farm-to-table, in Oregon and across the U.S., the dairy community is committed to nourishing people while minimizing impacts to the environment and preserving natural resources.

Sustainable Wellness
Dairy is a nutritious and affordable choice that fuels overall wellness. 

  • Dairy foods are linked to health benefits like reduced inflammation, improved digestive health and healthy immune systems.  Read more about the Health Benefits of Dairy.
  • Milk is a nutrient powerhouse with 13 essential nutrients. Check out more Milk Facts.

Sustainable Planet
Dairy is committed to being an environmental solution – raising the bar on social and environmental responsibility. 

  • In 2020, U.S. dairy set aggressive new environmental sustainability goals to achieve carbon neutrality or better, optimize water usage and improve water quality by 2050.  
  • Everyday 306 million pounds of food by-products are kept out of landfills thanks to dairy cows’ unique ability to upcyle. Find out why we think cows are nutrition superheros
  • Two Oregon dairy farms and one dairy co-op have received national recognition for their sustainability. Learn about award winning dairy in Oregon.

Sustainable Communities
Dairy contributes to strong, thriving communities and is accessible to all. 

  • Dairy farmers are proud members of America’s essential workforce.
  • The dairy community is working hard to ensure every child has access to nutrient-rich foods, including dairy foods, to help them grow, learn and thrive. Read about school breakfast and child nutrition programs in Oregon.
  • Each year, farmers and dairy companies work with local food banks to deliver nutritious dairy foods to those in need, providing 469 million pounds of dairy- including milk, cheese and yogurt –  to Feeding America in 2020 alone. Find out more about how farmers fight Hunger.

Looking for more information on how dairy nourishes people while responsibly caring for our planet and animals?  Join the Dairy Nourishes Network.

Members of the network receive the latest dairy research, resources and recipes, as well as opportunities for free continuing education.

Earning Top Honors: Dairy Awards in Oregon

Sustainability, quality, innovation … you could say the Oregon dairy community has a lot to celebrate. And you’d be right! Over the past couple of years, our producers, processors, and individuals within the community keep setting the bar higher, earning recognition regionally, nationally, and even internationally.

Oregon Dairy Farmers Association Awards

To acknowledge individuals for their lifelong contributions to Oregon’s Dairy Industry, the Oregon Dairy Farmers Association presents two annual awards at the state convention. Recent recipients have included:

  • Community Service Award – Roger and Jessie DeJager (2020)
  • Distinguished Service Award – Troy Downing (2020)  
  • Community Service Award – Tom Johnson (2019)
  • Distinguished Service Award – Will Wise and Julie Hoffman (2019)

Oregon Dairy Industries Awards

Oregon Dairy Industries, also known as ODI, was founded in 1910 to promote and elevate interest in dairy food products in the western United States. Each year, exceptional ODI members are recognized with the Oregon Dairy Industries Award. The 2020 Sweepstakes Award recipients included:

For more winners, visit oregondairy.org.

Oregon Ag Fest Education Awards

Oregon Ag Fest seeks to reward student organizations, nonprofit groups or classrooms that promote and educate Oregonians about agriculture. In 2020, Lost River FFA of Merrill, Oregon, won first place, and the Oregon Dairy Princess Ambassador program won second place. The Oregon Dairy Women’s Dairy Princess Ambassador Program was created in 1959 to promote and provide outreach on behalf of the Oregon dairy industry. In 2019, they were able to reach more than 10,000 students statewide with in school presentations and county fairs. In 2020, they adjusted their programs to meet students virtually. 

Ida Ruby (lower left) and Jessie DeJager (lower right) of the Oregon Dairy Women receiving the 
2019 OSU Diamond Pioneer Agricultural Achievement Award.

College of Agricultural Sciences at Oregon State University

In 2019, at two separate awards ceremonies for the College of Agricultural Sciences at Oregon State University, five individuals were recognized, including some familiar names. Ida Ruby and Jessie DeJager of the Oregon Dairy Women received the 2019 OSU Diamond Pioneer Agricultural Achievement Award. Phil Ward, now a board member for ODNC, received the Distinguished Legacy Award. Greg Harris, the director of farming and agronomy for Threemile Canyon Farms, received the Distinguished Alumni Luminary Award. And our very own Executive Director for ODNC, Pete Kent, took home a College of Agricultural Sciences Hall of Fame honor.

Here are some videos from past recipients:

Greg Harris / Threemile Canyon Farms / Alumni Luminary Award
Phil Ward, USDA Farm Service Agency, Alumni Legacy Award
Pete Kent, Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council, CAS Hall of Fame

Oregon State University Extension Service

Threemile Canyon Farms (pictured above) was recognized in 2020 with the Cooperator of the Year Award from the Oregon State University Extension Service through it’s work with 4H programs in Morrow County. This award honors individuals and businesses who have made a significant contribution to OSU Extension in program involvement, support and community service.

Jeff Wendler, Director of Livestock at Threemile Canyon Farms, accepting the Cooperator of the Year Award.
Threemile Canyon Farms, winner of the 2020 U.S. Dairy Sustainability Award.

U.S. Dairy Sustainability Awards

The Oregon dairy community has proven they can walk the walk when talking about sustainability. As an annual award that recognizes dairy farms, businesses and collaborative partnerships that demonstrate outstanding economic, environmental and social benefits, Oregon provides powerful examples of dairy sustainability leadership.  

American Cheese Society

The American Cheese Society Judging and Competition is the largest competition of its kind for American cheese. The awards are designed to shine a spotlight on American cheesemakers by showcasing their talents and work as leaders within the industry. Unfortunately, this competition has been cancelled for 2020 and 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, many Oregon cheesemakers were celebrated in 2019.

World Dairy Expo Championship Dairy Product Contest

This contest, sponsored by the Wisconsin Dairy Products Association, is unique because it includes all dairy products. This competition was also cancelled because of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, but it gives us an opportunity to continue celebrating Oregon’s winners in 2019:

National Milk Producers Federation

A celebration of American cheesemakers, NMPF’s yearly competition went virtual in 2020. In spite of the virtual contest, they still received nearly 190 entries of cheese and cottage cheese. Darigold claimed top honors for Best Cottage Cheese last year with their Pineapple Cottage Cheese.

Briar Rose Creamery’s Maia Cheese won the Good Food Awards Cheese category in 2019.

Good Food Awards

Presented by the Good Food Foundation, this award is not solely focused on dairy food products, and it is judged on quality, sustainability and socially responsible production. Amongst the nearly 2,000 entries in 16 different categories, Oregon creameries have been highlighted several years running. 

Quality Chek’d Production Excellence Awards

These awards recognize its member creameries that go above and beyond in a variety of categories, including: production, quality, marketing, and customer service, highlighting superior performance in finished product quality, plant appearance, cleanliness, efficiency, management leadership and process control. Criteria includes laboratory test scores and evaluation of a plant’s process systems. The 2020 award winners included:

Rogue Creamery’s Rogue River Blue cheese won Grand Champion at the World Cheese Awards, 2019.

World Cheese Awards (Bergamo, Italy) 

In the Olympics of all cheese competitions, cheeses are sent from around the world to be judged in a single day. Judges work in teams of three to identify cheeses worthy of a gold, silver, or bronze award based on the rind, color, texture, consistency and of course, taste. All teams also nominate a “Super Gold” from their table, and those top cheeses are judged a second time by a “Super Jury” of international judges. The final cheeses are debated in front of a live consumer and trade audience before choosing the Grand Champion Cheese on live television. In 2019, the first-ever American cheese was selected as the best in the world, and it was from Oregon. 

This string of impressive awards and accomplishments speaks volumes about the individuals and organizations integral to the Oregon dairy community. Oregon may be a smaller dairy state compared to others in the U.S., but our positive impacts, high standards and great accomplishments continue to put our state among the best in class – now and into the future.

RELATED LINKS

OREGON’S THREEMILE CANYON FARMS WINS NATIONAL SUSTAINABILITY AWARD

DAIRY DONE RIGHT: TILLAMOOK HONORED NATIONALLY FOR COMMUNITY IMPACT

FARMING WITH INNOVATION AND HEART EARNS NATIONAL AWARD FOR RICKREALL DAIRY

GOING ROGUE: OREGON CHEESE MAKES A BIG STATEMENT

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE OREGON DAIRY WOMEN, AG CONNECTION AWARD WINNERS

Time is Running Out for these Dairy and Ag Scholarships

Spring is in the air, a time when many high school graduates and college students are looking to the future as they consider higher education and their future careers. Luckily, there are scholarships available to help pay for the ever-increasing costs.

The dairy community and others in the world of agriculture are also looking to the future as they seek to invest in the next generation of students who are seeking to make their career home in agriculture. 

If you’re interested in an agricultural-related degree, don’t miss out on these scholarship opportunities! Deadlines are fast approaching, so the time to act is now. 


Oregon Dairy Farmers Association Scholarship – Due May 1

Awarded to the son or daughter of a current Oregon dairy producer attending a four-year college or university. 

Oregon Dairy Women Scholarship – Due May 1

Awarded to students majoring in Animal Science, Food Science, Veterinary Science, Nutrition, Dietetics or other areas related or having an impact on the dairy industry, or be the son or daughter of an Oregon dairy family or worked on a dairy for at least two years or had a 4-H or FFA dairy project for four years. 

National Dairy Promotion and Research Board – Due May 7

Awards up to 11 $2500 scholarships to eligible undergrad students enrolled in college/university programs that emphasize dairy. 

Farm Bureau Scholarships – Deadlines vary per county

Awarded to high school students, or students enrolled in an accredited school of higher education, who are pursuing a field that relates to, or benefits, agriculture. 

College Aggies Online

Connecting college students from across the country who are passionate about sharing positive information about animal agriculture. 

Oregon has many great institutions where students can earn degrees at all levels from associate to doctoral, gaining work experience along the way. There are many career opportunities related to agriculture and food production to fit many interests, from food science to animal nutrition, veterinary services to agronomy. 

Related Links:

WHO’S WHO: CAREERS IN FOOD

FREE MONEY? SCHOLARSHIPS IN DAIRY AND AGRICULTURE

DAIRY PRINCESS AMBASSADOR GOES INTERNATIONAL

Food Hero’s Gardening Challenge helps kids grow with dairy and plants

Join ODNC and Food Hero with Food Hero’s Grow This! Oregon Garden Challenge this spring. 38,000 free seed packets, donated by Bi-Mart, will be distributed by Food Hero to Oregon state residents as part of the program which aims to inspire kids to grow their own gardens and eat a healthy diet.

You can register to pick up a seed kit with Food Hero while supplies last. The seed packets will be available in 4 different seed kits: cool-weather vegetables, warm-weather vegetables, herb or edible flowers and flowers that attract pollinators, like bees and birds. Or you can join in with your own seeds, says Halie Cousineau, OSU Extension Food Hero state garden education coordinator.

The Food Hero Facebook page will hold weekly office hours when gardeners can ask questions, post photos and share their accomplishments, Cousineau said. Once they harvest their produce, gardeners can find more than 300 recipes using vegetables and fruits on the Food Hero website.

Children are a big part of the program. Beginning April 1, digital lessons will be released every Thursday through June 10 when school ends. The lineup includes Growing Healthy Kids with OSU Master Gardeners and a four-week lesson plan in partnership with the Oregon Bee Project. Kids will learn about how bees help make healthy food and how to identify several of Oregon’s bees.

Kids can upcycle their yogurt or milk containers and use sleeves provided by ODNC to help track the care and progress of their plants. Download yours here!

Throughout summer and into fall, participants will receive a monthly Grow This! Oregon Garden Challenge email with gardening information, harvest recipes and storage tips. Challenge information will also be available in English and Spanish on the Food Hero gardening page. For more personalized interaction, participants can email challenge leaders or email or call the Master Gardeners in their area.

“We’re trying to make the program accessible to anyone, children, elders, people with special needs and the diversity of cultural populations in Oregon,” said Cousineau. “We’re encouraging people anywhere to join. We want to make a community.”

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