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“Scoop It Forward” Promotes Random Acts of Ice Cream

1 Scoop logoJuly 15 is National Ice Cream Day, which also kicks off a celebration of appreciation called “Scoop It Forward.” Supported by Oregon’s dairy farmers and processors, the week-long campaign, from July 15 to 22, encourages people to show appreciation for one another through random acts of ice cream.

“Ice cream is one of those things that just makes everything better, and we saw this as a simple way to bring positivity and joy to people’s lives in surprising and unexpected ways,” said Josh Thomas, Senior Director of Communications for the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council. “Random acts of kindness can be contagious, and our call to action is simply for people to spread the good and pay it forward.”

Leading up to this week, there have already been surprise ice cream deliveries to a playground, a skate park, a police station and Pioneer Courthouse Square in downtown Portland. And that’s just the beginning. Each person who receives ice cream is encouraged to recognize at least two others with a special delivery of their own.

Suggestions include recognizing family, friends, neighbors, a favorite teacher, local police or fire departments or even complete strangers. Photos and video from these moments will be shared on social media using the hashtag #ScoopItForward. Those who aren’t able to give ice cream are encouraged to send ice cream emojis with a message of appreciation. Organizers hope the positivity will spread far and wide.

“This is such a simple gesture that anybody can do,” said Thomas. “You can’t buy happiness, but you can buy ice cream, and that’s pretty close”

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Pie for Breakfast? Yes please!

Start your 4th of July off right with this tasty red, white, and blue fruit, yogurt, and cereal pie.

Serves 10

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Dietitian’s Tip: This Breakfast Greek Yogurt Pie will add dairy protein, healthy fruits, and whole grains to your day.

 

INGREDIENTS

5 cups bran flakes cereal
½ cup chopped walnuts
6 tablespoons unsalted melted butter
4 tablespoons honey
6 (5.3 oz.) cups of plain, nonfat Greek yogurt
2 ½ cups fresh fruit (sliced strawberries, blueberries, raspberries or pomegranate seeds)

 

INSTRUCTIONS

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Add cereal and nuts to food processor bowl and pulse about 10 times until combined.

Transfer cereal and nuts to large bowl. Drizzle with the honey and melted butter.

Mix well and press into 9 inch pie pan.

Place pie pan in the oven and bake about 8 minutes until just starting to brown.

Transfer to wire rack and cool. Shell can be made 1-2 days in advance if desired.

When ready to serve, fill with yogurt and top with strawberries and blueberries.

 

NUTRITIONAL FACTS

Per serving: 250 calories, 12 g total fat, 5 g saturated fat, 29 g carbohydrate, 12 g protein, 4 g fiber, 174 mg sodium, 296 mg potassium, 50 mg magnesium, 121 mg calcium

 

Recipe courtesy of  Tillamook and Pacific Pie Company

Try A New Kind of Ice Cream Float

Have a relaxing “float” through summer with this idea for a treat with less sugar and calories. Of course you can always make it more indulgent by using your favorite soda flavor.

Serves 1

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Dietitian’s Tip: These floats made with sparkling mineral water will contribute less sugar and calories to your diet than traditional floats.

 

INGREDIENTS

1 scoop (½ cup) vanilla ice cream
2 tablespoons of your favorite mashed berry or fruit
6 oz. sparkling mineral water

 

INSTRUCTIONS

Mash frozen or fresh fruit.

Add ice cream and fruit to glass.

Add sparkling water to glass.

Serve with a wide straw and a spoon.

 

NUTRITIONAL FACTS

147 calories, 7 g total fat, 5 g saturated fat, 18 g carbohydrate, 3 g protein, 1 g fiber, 91 mg sodium, 179 mg potassium, 15 mg magnesium, 98 mg calcium

Rumor has it the ice cream float was invented in 1874 when an entrepreneur ran out of ice for the flavored drinks he was selling and added ice cream. READ MORE

Pear Quesadillas

Food Hero has a wealth of easy to make, nutritious recipes to liven up your summer days. Here is an easy summer lunch idea for the kids … or yourself.

Serves 4

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Dietitian’s Tip: This recipe is a great addition to a healthy diet serving up dairy protein, fruit, vegetables, and whole grains. Come up with your own combination using different fruits and vegetables.

 

INGREDIENTS

4 medium whole wheat tortillas
1 cup grated cheese (try cheddar, jack, or pepper jack)
1 cup pear slices (fresh or canned/drained)
½ cup finely chopped green or red peppers
2 tablespoons minced onion (green, red, or yellow)

 

INSTRUCTIONS

Lay two tortillas on two plates.

Divide the cheese between the two tortillas.

Divide the pears, peppers, and onion between the two tortillas.

Top with remaining two tortillas.

Heat a skillet or griddle to medium (300 degrees in an electric skillet). Place one quesadilla in pan. Cook 2-4 minutes, or until bottom of quesadilla begins to look a little brown.

With large spatula, gently turn the quesadilla over and cook the other side until a little brown, 2-4 minutes.

Gently slide quesadilla onto a plate. Cook the second quesadilla.

Cut each cooked quesadilla into 4 pieces and serve.

 

NUTRITIONAL FACTS

Per serving: 250 calories, 8 g total fat, 3.5 g saturated fat, 31 g carbohydrate, 11 g protein, 4 g dietary fiber, 400 mg sodium

Recipe courtesy of Food Hero

Discover the Art of Dairy

Throughout Portland, Salem and the state of Oregon, you can find artistic interpretations of dairy cows and dairy farming on public display … if you know where to look. For June Dairy Month, we picked six of our favorites for a visual scavenger hunt that we called “Dairy Everywhere.”

It wasn’t easy, but Mary Owen of Salem was able to identify (at least partially) four of the six locations, earning her an Undeniably Dairy prize package. “This was a tough contest!” said Owen, “I learned a lot through it though.”

As promised when the contest was announced, here are the locations:

We’re hearing rumors that a very special Brown Swiss cow could be added to Albany’s Historic Carousel and Museum sometime soon. Although this contest is over, you can send us additional suggestions to be added to our online gallery of dairy art anytime. Happy hunting!

Caprese-Style Cottage Cheese Topper

Serve on toasted slices of Italian or French bread. A light, refreshing appetizer for your summertime parties.

Serves 6

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Dietitian’s Tip: A great way to get a boost of dairy protein with 11 grams of protein per serving.

 

INGREDIENTS

2 cups 2% fat cottage cheese
1 cup coarsely chopped fresh tomatoes
¼ cup chopped fresh basil
¼ cup toasted slivered almonds
5-6 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
½ teaspoon ground black pepper

 

INSTRUCTIONS

Coarsely chop the tomato.

Chop the fresh basil.

Mince the garlic cloves.

Toast the slivered almonds until lightly brown in a skillet over medium heat. Watch them carefully.

Combine all ingredients and blend well.

Serve on toasted bread of your choice.

 

NUTRITIONAL FACTS

Per serving: 115 calories, 6 g total fat, 1 g saturated fat, 6 g carbohydrate, 11 g protein, 2 g fiber, 317 mg sodium, 201 mg potassium, 29 mg magnesium, 108 mg calcium

 

Photo and adapted recipe courtesy of Darigold

Honey Lemon Panna Cotta

This Italian-inspired creamy dessert is the perfect end to any meal, and toppings are customizable to every season.

Serves 8

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Dietitian’s Tip: Top with

  • Seasonal fresh fruit, such as berries or chopped peaches (frozen works, too.)
  • Mint leaves and canned mandarin orange segments

 

INGREDIENTS

2 cups 1% low-fat milk
1 cup low-fat buttermilk
2 packets unflavored gelatin
1 cup fat-free plain yogurt
1/3 cup mild honey
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
½ teaspoon vanilla extract
½ teaspoon lemon zest

 

INSTRUCTIONS

Pour milk and buttermilk into a small saucepan. Sprinkle gelatin over the milk. Let sit for 1 to 2 minutes to soften.

Turn stove heat to low, heat milk and gelatin, stirring constantly to melt gelatin, about 6-8 minutes. Remove from heat.

In a large bowl, combine yogurt, honey, lemon juice, vanilla, and lemon zest. Pour in warm milk. Stir to combine and remove lumps. To make smooth, you can blend with an immersion blender or a blender.

Pour Panna Cotta into serving vessel – a large bowl, pie plate, or individual cups. Refrigerate until firm or overnight. The size of the container will impact this but it could be at least 4 hours.

Top with fruit such as blueberries, chopped strawberries, or cooked rhubarb.

 

NUTRITIONAL FACTS

Per serving: 98 calories, 1 g total fat, 1 g saturated fat, 19 g carbohydrate, 5 g protein, 0 g fiber, 107 mg sodium, 220 mg potassium, 16 mg magnesium, 169 mg calcium

Choose milk, buttermilk and plain yogurt in the fat level (fat-free, low fat, reduced-fat or whole) that best fits your personal health goals.

Recipe courtesy of Live Best

Dairy Done Right: Tillamook Honored Nationally for Community Impact

Contributions include fighting hunger, advocating for housing and supporting youth

Guided by the “Dairy Done Right” philosophy, Tillamook County Creamery Association has earned top awards for its cheese, ice cream, yogurt, sour cream and butter. Now the dairy farmer-owned cooperative has earned a national award for its commitment to the communities where Tillamook employees live and work.

IMG_3589Tillamook County Creamery Association
Outstanding Community Impact Award

Among the many reasons why Tillamook rose to the top of their category:

  • Support for the Oregon Food Bank has included contributions of funds, food, a distribution truck, a food drive and research about food insecurity with the goal of eliminating hunger statewide.
  • Funded a study on the root causes of the local housing shortage, and its gift of $75,000 allowed CARE to continue its mission of providing emergency aid to the homeless and those in crisis.
  • Collaborated with the Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington on a dairy patch to educate young girls about STEM concepts, farms and food production.
  • Committed $1.5 million to a new food innovation center to Oregon State University.
  • As part of an employee-led volunteer program, 118 members of the company volunteered 1,200 hours within the first year.

“Tillamook exemplifies devotion to their community,” said Barbara O’Brien, president of the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy. “From working to find the root cause of food insecurity to improving housing access, they are addressing large-scale issues that impact the people and the planet.”

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Sarah Beaubien, Senior Director of Stewardship for TCCA

The Outstanding Community Impact Award was the only one given in that category nationally. The announcement was made on May 16 at a special ceremony outside of Chicago, Illinois, where it was accepted by Sarah Beaubien, Tillamook’s senior director of stewardship, alongside staff and board members. True to the spirit of the award, CEO Patrick Criteser was unable to receive the award because he was in the middle of a 300-mile bike ride to raise funds and awareness to help end childhood hunger.

As James Dillard, corporate and community relations manager at the Oregon Food Bank, said, “They are not giving away money just to improve their brand rating. They really are passionate about making a difference in Oregon.”

With Tillamook’s award, Oregon went back-to-back with U.S. Dairy Sustainability Awards following last year’s “Outstanding Dairy Farm Sustainability Award” for Rickreall Dairy. Also of note for 2018 was Kroger’s win for “Outstanding Dairy Processing and Manufacturing Sustainability,” which includes Oregon’s own Swan Island Dairy.

To hear Sarah Beaubien’s acceptance speech at the award ceremony, watch the video below:

 

 

Related Links:

Meet the winners of the 2018 U.S. Dairy Sustainability Awards | DairyGood

Tillamook County Creamery Association Wins National Community Impact Award | NEWS RELEASE

Outstanding Community Impact: Tillamook County Creamery Association | FACT SHEET

Former NFL Player Tackles Dairy Farming For a Day

Over his 12-year career in the National Football League, Anthony Newman regularly faced finely-tuned athletes weighing more than 300 pounds. But it wasn’t until he visited a dairy farm that he came eye to eye with a finely-tuned 1,300 pounder – a Holstein cow at Rickreall Dairy.

As a supporter of one of the nation’s largest in-school nutrition and physical activity programs, Fuel Up to Play 60, Newman regularly encourages kids to eat healthy, be active and make positive changes in their schools and communities. He’s a big fan of including milk and dairy products in a healthy diet, but he had never had the opportunity to visit a dairy farm.

Located outside of Oregon’s state capital of Salem, Rickreall Dairy was a 2017 U.S. Dairy Sustainability Award winner. Newman took an all-access tour of the farm, and he was impressed. After seeing how well the cows are treated, what they eat, how natural resources are protected and meeting the employees, he said he gained new appreciation for how much hard work and dedication it takes to keep a dairy farm running.

Since retiring from football, Newman has been a successful sports broadcaster and devotes his time to support youth through sports camps, coaching and speaking about the importance of health and wellness for the Fuel Up to Play 60 program. Inspired and led by youth, Fuel Up to Play 60 was created by the National Dairy Council and the NFL, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The program is administered in Oregon by the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council.

View the embedded video to hear Anthony Newman’s thoughts and observations after experiencing dairy farming for a day at Rickreall Dairy.

Think Like a Farmer, Honor the Harvest

Erin Fitzgerald

What do sustainability and nutrition have in common? Everything. That’s according to Erin Fitzgerald, senior vice president of global sustainability for the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy.

She addressed the Oregon Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Educational Conference as keynote speaker on May 4, conveying the importance of consumers and farmers working together to preserve the world’s resources while feeding America and a growing global population. Fitzgerald leads efforts to enhance dairy’s contributions to a more sustainable food system.

At the conference, Fitzgerald addressed the world’s need for food and the natural resources needed to produce food, stating that:

“We are exceeding the caring capacity of this earth. And since the global middle class will triple by 2030, we need to be prepared to provide more food. But how? We are losing 50 acres of farmland an hour due to urban encroachment. Our farmland is our rainforest. It is our nation’s greatest natural resource.”

However, she offered a message of hope. “I absolutely do believe we can solve for this. But it’s going to take an incredible amount of innovation,” she said. Fitzgerald addressed three major pathways toward sustainable food systems:


   Reduce waste and inefficiencies.

   Manage natural resource constraints.

   Advance farm technologies for crops in a bio economy.

Fitzgerald sees incredible benefits to advancement in technology. “By unlocking the potential of agriculture we will be able to cycle and manage carbon through agriculture, to solve for climate change,” she said. She followed that the biggest need is to create a revolution where consumers commit to adopt a farmers mentality to leave this earth as a legacy for future generations. “How are we going to get people on a sustainability pathway if we don’t already have the values and commitment to leave this world better than we found it?” said Fitzgerald.

She encouraged nutrition professionals by saying, “Take comfort in this stat that 48% of our land, air and water is in the stewardship of our farmers. They are truly providing these ecosystem services that we have taken for granted.” She went on to explain, “Dairy was the first industry sector to make a commitment to climate change.”

But aside from the sustainable practices that are ingrained in a farmer’s way of life, Fitzgerald also points out how important the cow is to our food system. “Because of the cow, we don’t have to wait for plant growing cycles, but we get nutrition year-round,” she said. “We take that for granted, but globally, around the world, to be able to provide nutrition 365 days while you are waiting for the crops to come in is a very big deal.”

As for the consumer’s role in sustainable nutrition, she explained that we are currently throwing away a third of the earth’s food. “Farmers are not going to have the chance to get this right unless people are eating healthy and not throwing their food away,” she said. “They are not honoring the harvest. What we do on our plates that has the greatest significance to the environmental impact.”

Fitzgerald encouraged her audience to create a ‘food-cycle movement,’ which includes: nourish people, eat right (leftovers too), get food to the food insecure, do your part in your community, and create a social handprint with food. She said, “That’s why I get excited to talk to [dietitians]. If someone is not there working with the consuming public on behavior change, then we won’t be able to solve for climate change.”

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