Category Archives: taste and health

Umatilla Learning Connection Town Hall Reaps Positive Results

Umatilla Learning Connection Town Hall

Families gathered at a local elementary school in Umatilla last month to learn how to cook healthy recipes that they could make together at home. It was a free class offered by Umatilla School District, Umatilla-Morrow Head Start and Oregon State University Extension Service; and it was precisely the kind of community collaboration that the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council had in mind when it organized the Umatilla Learning Connection Town Hall.

At the town hall meeting last October, local community leaders from education, school nutrition, extension, public health, health care and agriculture joined together to discuss how nutrition, physical activity, health and education impact student success. Together, the participants are strengthening local networks in Umatilla and Morrow counties and engaging a broad range of stakeholders in supporting the proven link between child health and wellness and education.

“The support for our students from teachers, child nutrition, after school and community programs has a clear and direct impact on their success,” said Heidi Sipe, Superintendent, Umatilla School District.

The town hall highlighted best practices in nutrition and physical activity and put the spotlight on Umatilla School District for their outstanding commitment to child health and success with innovative approaches to ensuring all kids are nourished for learning. Participants walked the new fitness trail at Umatilla High School, which was partially funded by the Fuel Up to Play 60 program and built by committed community members.

Town hall participants were asked to commit to school and community wellness with time and resources in the next school year and beyond. They each identified 90-day goals to keep the connections active and further their shared goal of advancing community health.  Participants will reconvene in one year to share their successes and continue their commitment.

“We need to do everything we can to stay connected and ensure the success of our students, families and community,” said Kevin Campbell, CEO, Eastern Oregon Coordinated Care Organization.

In addition to the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council, the Umatilla Learning Connection Town Hall was supported by: Umatilla School District, Umatilla County, OSU Extension SNAP-Ed, Intermountain ESD, Good Shepherd Health Care System, Umatilla-Morrow Head Start, Oregon Department of Education (ODE) Child Nutrition Program and ODE Office of Teaching and Learning.

Improving Nutrition, Healthcare Outcomes in Older Adults

older-adults

Nationwide, up to 60 percent of hospitalized older adults may be malnourished, with an estimated price tag of $51.3 billion. It is no surprise that a 300 percent increase in health care costs can be attributed to poor nutrition status.  In Oregon, Registered Dietitian Nutritionists are in the forefront of the fight to prevent and treat malnutrition.

Partnering with nutrition leaders, Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council is working to raise awareness and has gathered educational tools to help health professionals recognize and treat malnutrition. The resources also help older adults realize that they need to ask about nutrition and advocate for improved care.ask-about-your-nutrition

Oregon Governor Kate Brown joined the Oregon Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in shining the light on the impact of malnutrition – especially in older adults – by proclaiming September 26 to 30 as Malnutrition Awareness Week in Oregon.

Preventing and treating malnutrition can be as simple as following the MyPlate guidelines.  Eating enough food and the right amounts from each food group is the key. Protein is especially important.

Everyone, and especially those at risk of malnutrition such as the ill or elderly, should aim to consume 3-4 ounces of protein at each meal (30 grams). Protein-rich dairy foods are a convenient, affordable and tasty option for seniors.  Try milk (lactose-free, if needed), cheese, Greek yogurt, yogurt and cottage cheese.  Find out what a serving is and how you can get enough with these fact sheets:

Protein Pointers

Eating to Optimize Surgery or Treatment

Eating to Meet Your Body’s Needs

Eating for Your Best Health

Malnutrition awareness is important. Learn more about this issue at this link to a KPTV television story with Providence nutrition services.

Providing Mentorship Today to Develop the Leaders of Tomorrow

dietetic intern

Anne Goetze, our senior director of nutrition affairs, was recently selected as a recipient of the 2016 Preceptor Award by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation. Only seven of these awards are available each year across the entire nation. A preceptor is a professional practitioner who is an exemplary educator, mentor and supervisor to students.

Did you know that the ODNC has an average of eight dietetic interns (future nutrition professionals) from Oregon State University and Oregon Health and Science University each year?  While here, they research the nutritional value of dairy, participate in dairy industry meetings, tour dairy farms and meet industry leaders and partners.anne goetze

“Serving as a preceptor is something all RDNs should do,” said Anne. “Not only is it our professional responsibility, it is a challenge that returns benefits time and again. I truly want each intern to succeed and am delighted to see them become colleagues and leaders as they develop their own careers. Interns bring a fresh perspective to our work, and I have learned so much from them through the years. I’m fortunate to work in an organization that values the education of dietetic interns.”

Anne is a recognized leader in the field of nutrition and dietetics throughout Oregon who has worked for ODNC for more than 25 years. Have questions about the nutritional value of dairy? Contact Anne at agoetze@odncouncil.org or 503-229-5033.

Federal Dietary Guidelines Recommend Dairy

dary foods

Early this year, the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGAs) were released jointly by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the United States Department of Health and Human Services. Similar to previous versions, the new DGAs recommend three servings of dairy each day as an important part of a healthy eating pattern.

The full report brings attention to the fact that daily dairy intake for most Americans falls below recommendations and calls for increased consumption. Adding one serving of dairy every day can help Americans get the nutrients they need in an easy and affordable way.

Dairy foods are nutrient rich and among the top sources of calcium, vitamin D and potassium, which are nutrients of concern in the American diet. Few other foods deliver dairy’s powerhouse of nutrients in such an affordable, appealing and readily available way. By comparison, it would take 21 cups of chopped broccoli to deliver the same amount of calcium as three glasses of milk.

The DGAs are significant because they form the foundation of all the USDA nutrition programs – school meals, WIC, Head Start, extension and SNAP-Ed. They also impact the nutrition recommendations health professionals give their patients and curriculum in the classroom.

RELATED ARTICLE: Decoding the Dairy Case

Prompting Positive Changes for Community Health

community health

What happens when a broad-based group of citizens comes together with a common goal to improve the health of their community? Change happens!

Just over a year ago, the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council (ODNC) organized a town hall gathering in Tillamook to bring together a diverse group of community leaders who care about health and wellness. This led to the Tillamook County Commission declaring 2016 the “Year of Wellness.”

Anne Goetze, Senior Director of Nutrition Affairs for ODNC, has been serving on their appointed task force and co-chairs the nutrition subcommittee. Additionally, this town hall led to ODNC’s work with the Oregon Department of Education and the Tillamook School District on wellness policy activation with Fuel Up to Play 60 as a featured program.

In August, a well-attended Community Health Matters Forum helped chart the course for ongoing community engagement. Results from an online challenge showed people making healthier food choices, preparing healthy meals and being more physically active every day. The success of this program serves as a model that will be introduced in Umatilla later this year.

For more information about the Year of Wellness efforts, visit their website at http://tillamookcountyhealthmatters.org/about-us/.

Decoding the Dairy Case

decoding-dairy-case

Milk provides a package of protein and essential nutrients that are not easily replaced with other foods. Among registered dietitians, family physicians and pediatricians who participated in a recent survey, fluid milk was among the top sources of calcium and vitamin D they recommended to their clients/patients.

So what’s up with all of the other items filling the shelves claiming to be milk or just like milk? Walk past the dairy case at any given grocery store, and the choices can be dizzying. To make matters even more confusing, the products’ nutrients are not consistent, and the ingredient lists range from simple to complex.

Only cow’s milk has a long track record of research supporting its health benefits, and other alternatives simply cannot match the complete nutritional equivalent. Non-dairy beverages have no FDA-regulated standard of identity as cow’s milk products do, and the nutrition claims for these items vary greatly.

To help you ‘decode the dairy case,’ here’s a short video from our friends at the American Dairy Association:

VIDEO

Honoring the Harvest: From Dairy Farm to Table

honor-the-harvest-fair-oaks-farms-web

At Honor the Harvest, a summit sponsored by the National Dairy Council in June, more than 200 professionals from the culinary, nutrition, health and wellness, and agricultural communities gathered to immerse themselves in the science and insights about dairy’s role from farm to table.

Representing Oregon at this national summit was Anne Goetze, our Senior Director of Nutrition Affairs, Oregon Health and Science University’s Sonja Connor and Oregon Department of Education’s Farm to School Specialist, Rick Sherman.

 

“Our Oregon guests are leaders locally and nationally. They were intrigued to hear dairy’s sustainability story,” said Anne.

From a packed day of educational sessions and application to a tour of the agricultural experience at Fair Oaks Farms in Indiana, participants learned about dairy’s key role as part of sustainable food systems.

“Honoring the harvest is about using the food for its highest purpose and moving nutrients through the food system – from people, to animals, and back to the land to grow more food – instead of going to waste in a landfill,” said Anne. “By working together we can preserve precious resources and feed a growing population.”