Search Results for: KIDS

What I Learned on My First Visit to a Dairy Farm

by Lindsay LeBrun, Graduate Student in Clinical Nutrition, Oregon Health & Science University

Lindsay LeBrunAs a nutrition intern for the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council, I recently had the opportunity to visit a dairy farm outside of Salem, Oregon, during my second week on the job. Since I didn’t grow up on a farm or have a background in dairy, this tour was an opportunity for me to learn about dairy production practices. I was also eager to learn what kinds of questions kids and parents had about milk and dairy.

After the hour-long car ride down I-5 from Portland, I made my final turn into a gravel parking lot and instantly knew I had found the right place. The excited yelps of fourth graders posing for a class picture made me turn my head as I stepped from my car. With cheesy grins they assembled in front of the wooden sign proudly proclaiming our location: “Rickreall Dairy.”

Cows eatingThis class is one of many that get a firsthand look at where their favorite dairy foods come from. At Rickreall Dairy, tour leader Stacy Foster conducts more than a dozen tours of the farm during the spring. The success of the program has allowed her to now expand to offering tours in the fall, and I was joining for the last tour of the season.

Foster, whose father owns the farm, began by acknowledging that she wouldn’t have hurt feelings if the kids (or parents) plug their noses. She admits it’s stinky, but that is to be expected when over 3,500 cows call this place home. Foster then asks the group if they know what milk is good for. Almost every hand goes up, and the chosen student announces, “bones.” “That’s right,” says Foster. “Milk has calcium and vitamin D for strong bones.”

Foster then leads us straight to the where the action happens: the milking parlor. This room operates 24 hours a day to ensure each cow gets two or three daily milking sessions. Foster tells us that each cow produces roughly 10 gallons every day, and overall the dairy produces 16,500 gallons daily! “Can you guys drink all of that milk?” she asks. A few cheeky responders reply with a “yes.” Foster laughs and says, “Well, you could probably eat all of that ice cream!”

We move on to the maternity barn where the sounds of the milking machines can no longer be heard. The children are excited to see two newborn calves beginning to take their first wobbly steps. This gives Foster the chance to explain the life cycle of a cow on the farm. The kids are surprised to hear that cows don’t just grow up and give milk – like humans, they have to have a baby first. As the kids peer over the enclosures to get a closer look, parents begin raising questions for Foster. “Is organic better than conventional milk?” “Can you taste a difference between different brands?” Foster points out that all milk sold in stores is held to the same standards for safety and quality. In fact, there are 27 regulatory agencies that Rickreall Dairy works with to be in compliance.

Calf milk bottlesWe end our tour by moving into the barn that houses the calves. “Who wants to bottle feed a calf?” asks Foster. She is met with an overwhelmingly enthusiastic response from kids and parents alike. The children each grab a bottle and file down the row of calves, who eagerly stick their head out in anticipation of the meal. The children giggle as the calves gobble all of it down, and the bottles are drained within minutes.

For most of these kids, and for me, this is the first time they have seen a dairy farm firsthand. The tours at Rickreall Dairy are a unique opportunity to help kids connect the farm to table concept. Their faces light up when presented with the idea that the cows they met today could be the same ones that made the milk in their fridge. For parents, they enjoy having questions resolved to help them make good choices in what they feed their children. As for myself, I loved gaining insight into food system production and hearing about what the consumers wanted to know. A huge thank you to Rickreall Dairy and the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council for making this experience possible!

Umatilla Learning Connection Town Hall Reaps Positive Results

Families gathered at a local elementary school in Umatilla last month to learn how to cook healthy recipes that they could make together at home. It was a free class offered by Umatilla School District, Umatilla-Morrow Head Start and Oregon State University Extension Service; and it was precisely the kind of community collaboration that the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council had in mind when it organized the Umatilla Learning Connection Town Hall.

At the town hall meeting last October, local community leaders from education, school nutrition, extension, public health, health care and agriculture joined together to discuss how nutrition, physical activity, health and education impact student success. Together, the participants are strengthening local networks in Umatilla and Morrow counties and engaging a broad range of stakeholders in supporting the proven link between child health and wellness and education.

“The support for our students from teachers, child nutrition, after school and community programs has a clear and direct impact on their success,” said Heidi Sipe, Superintendent, Umatilla School District.

The town hall highlighted best practices in nutrition and physical activity and put the spotlight on Umatilla School District for their outstanding commitment to child health and success with innovative approaches to ensuring all kids are nourished for learning. Participants walked the new fitness trail at Umatilla High School, which was partially funded by the Fuel Up to Play 60 program and built by committed community members.

Town hall participants were asked to commit to school and community wellness with time and resources in the next school year and beyond. They each identified 90-day goals to keep the connections active and further their shared goal of advancing community health.  Participants will reconvene in one year to share their successes and continue their commitment.

“We need to do everything we can to stay connected and ensure the success of our students, families and community,” said Kevin Campbell, CEO, Eastern Oregon Coordinated Care Organization.

In addition to the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council, the Umatilla Learning Connection Town Hall was supported by: Umatilla School District, Umatilla County, OSU Extension SNAP-Ed, Intermountain ESD, Good Shepherd Health Care System, Umatilla-Morrow Head Start, Oregon Department of Education (ODE) Child Nutrition Program and ODE Office of Teaching and Learning.

Louie Kazemier: Dairy Farmer, Humanitarian, Heart of Gold

Louie-Kazemier-working-in-Uganda

As a teenager, Louie Kazemier may have never envisioned becoming a dairy farmer as he was decorating wedding cakes, but he has always had a huge heart for helping people. From special needs kids and their families at Camp Attitude in Oregon to farmers in Uganda, Louie and his family continually give of their time and talents.

“The whole experience is very rewarding.” —Louie Kazemier

CAMP ATTITUDE, “CHANGING LIVES ONE CAMPER AT A TIME”

In 1998, Camp Attitude was nothing more than a shared dream between two men, a dairy farmer/youth pastor and a quadriplegic who wanted to make a positive difference.  Two years, countless volunteer and manual labor hours and hundreds of thousands of dollars later, Camp Attitude became a reality under Louie’s leadership.

Over the next several years, Louie, his family and hundreds of volunteers poured their hearts and souls into Camp Attitude and its campers. Camp administration was run out of the same office as the dairy farm. Registrations doubled every year (there’s no cost to attend). In between caring for his dairy cows and farm, Louie spent his off-season recruiting high school volunteers to serve as “Buddies” for his special needs campers. “It was fun to sit back and see how the Lord was going to work it all out,” said Louie.

Today the camp is a thriving, fully accessible facility where special needs kids and their families come and actively participate in an uplifting outdoor environment. Camp Attitude’s vision is to help people become emotionally balanced, socially adjusted, physically well and spiritually alive.

While Louie has stepped down as Director, he maintains many of the special relationships he developed with campers and their families during his time with Camp Attitude. He makes himself available to them whenever he is needed—and sadly, for these families, sometimes that means a midnight hospital visit or funeral. But there are happy visits too.  For example, when Bryten, a 16-year old girl with Brittle Bone Disease, gets to visit his farm and help in the milking parlor.

FARMING IN UGANDA

With a heart for the welfare of others, it wasn’t long before Louie found another opportunity where he could serve—halfway around the world.

Louie met Wilfred Blair Rugumba, Executive Director of Mercy Child Care and a young pastor from Uganda, when Wilfred visited Faith Christian School in Dallas, Oregon.  After a few minutes of visiting, Wilfred asked to see Louie’s “American dairy farm”. After asking dozens of questions, Wilfred was blown away by the technology, efficiency and expertise of Louie and his farming operation. Wilfred said, “You need to come to Uganda and teach us how to do this.”  One thing led to another and Louie found himself in Uganda about eight months later.

Louie was unprepared for what he would experience: a country slightly smaller than Oregon but with ten times the population, no or limited basic utilities, hand-dug wells, an average income of $3 per day, not even an address/postal system.

He recalled the time when he first arrived in Uganda missing some luggage, “There is no address system. So we instructed them to bring the baggage to Light the World Church along Hoima Road between this landmark and that landmark.”

“I thought to myself, ‘I’ll never see that luggage again,” laughed Louie. “But the next morning, the luggage was there.”

Louie’s first trip to Uganda was spent meeting the people, learning the culture and scoping out Mercy Ministry’s farm. He learned that Uganda has only two growing seasons for corn because of the rains.  During the off-season, this food staple is too expensive for Ugandan families.  So Louie’s first order of business is to help build an irrigation system to grow corn year-round and to raise money for a tractor.

Mercy Ministries also has seven dairy cows and Louie is sharing his knowledge and expertise in dairy production.  Baby formula imported from the United States is terribly expensive.  There are other dairies in Uganda, but only the wealthy can afford the fluid milk they produce. Nutrient-dense foods like dairy are in high demand in Africa and most experts think that the key to reducing hunger in Africa is to increase the food supply locally.

Not only does Louie lend his expertise and experience in farming and agriculture, he and his son, Nate, helped to build the Ministry’s Medical Center which opened in Summer 2016.  His son-in-law, a student at The College of Osteopathic Medicine in Lebanon, Oregon, plans to join Louie and Nate on one of their upcoming trips to Uganda to help out in the Center.

“The whole experience is very rewarding,” says Louie, “and I’m very close with the people there.”

Meanwhile, back on the dairy farm in Rickreall, ask his employees (aka extended family) what they think of Louie’s humanitarian efforts and they’d tell him “we do what we do here so you can go do what you do there.” Louie’s next trip to Uganda is planned for April 2017.

MORE INFORMATION

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Camp Attitude
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Mercy Childcare Ministry

 

Throwing for Tokyo, Driven By Dairy

With the close of the Rio Olympics, the summer games will be out of sight and out of mind for most until the Olympic flame reignites in Japan in 2020. There are some though, whose competitive spirit still burns bright. Melissa Ausman, a national-caliber discus thrower and senior at Concordia University in Oregon, is one such athlete with her sights set on the Tokyo Olympics.melissa-ausman-headshot

It’s a long way to Tokyo from the dairy farm in Nyssa, Oregon, where Melissa grew up – 5,135 miles to be exact. And that dairy farm is where it all began, starting with her relentless work ethic and mental fortitude. Just ask her father, Frank.

“Melissa and all the kids basically started out just like I did as a kid out here; you start with taking care of the baby calves, haying and graining, and you work your way up the ladder,” he said. “Out here, you figure out real quick that it doesn’t matter what day it is or how cold or hot it is or whatever, the work has to be done.”dairy farm in nyssa oregon

Melissa agreed, “There are no days off when you’re on the dairy, or trying to reach your goals.”

Ausman began throwing for sport in seventh grade, when she discovered her drive to become an Olympic athlete. Her throwing career was instigated by her competitive side, urging her to throw better than her older brother. She continued to improve over the years that followed, winning state in high school, setting records at Oregon State University, and now training for that next big step at Concordia University.

Currently, she can throw a discus 53.91 meters (176.87 feet), which is beyond the width of an NFL football field. This distance has Ausman just 40 feet away from qualifying for the Olympics. Within two years, she will achieve this mark if she continues to add distance at her current pace.

Ausman has immersed herself completely into her training. Even on her weekly rest day where she stays home from the gym, she continually trains her mind by learning how to improve. That means keeping current on Olympic medalists and working aspects of their training into her routines. She has also learned the importance of balance. melissa-ausman-training

“I’m a sister, daughter, student, athlete — and each one represents a spoke on a wheel,” said Ausman. “If I spend too much on one spoke, then I have a lumpy, lopsided wheel.” After coming to this realization during her sophomore year, Ausman found her balance and beat her personal discus record by 19 feet.

Ausman also depends on the nutritional benefits of dairy in her training regimen. She shamelessly sports an overstuffed bag full of whey protein powder containers to ensure access to nutrition after workouts. Before bed, Melissa’s favorite snack is cottage cheese with pears and cinnamon. She also enjoys greek yogurt as a replacement for mayonnaise; one of many gems she has gleaned from her avid Pinterest searching. To Ausman, training in the kitchen and fueling her body properly is another vital spoke in her wheel of life.

What advice does Melissa offer to aspiring athletes? “Whatever effort you are willing to put into your sport, the results will come accordingly,” she said. “No one else is going to give you the drive to be the best.” She also warned against dwelling on setbacks, suggesting that you can’t get stuck in the past if you want to be focused on your future.
Speaking of the future, what do mom and dad think of Melissa’s Olympic aspirations?

“Oh, she’ll get there, I’m sure,” said Frank. “Anytime I have ever doubted her, she has proven me wrong.”

“She gets her mind set on what she wants to do, and that’s what she’s going to do,” said Lyndia. “I’m not going to put off getting a passport.”

SCHOOLS

In schools and communities throughout Oregon, the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council and its many partners are actively involved with supporting quality education, active lifestyles and healthy communities. The Council administers grants for equipment and activities, partners on award and recognition programs and manages health and wellness programs. Reach out to us to find out how we’re supporting your schools and local community.


RESOURCES  Newsletters, fact sheets, quantity recipes and more

STORIES  Successful programs in Oregon schools


Looking to support health and wellness at your school? Funding is available for healthy eating and physical activity initiatives for Oregon schools. Apply today for Fuel Up to Play 60 grants of up to $4,000 per school.

April 26 – June 14, 2017

FUEL UP TO PLAY 60 IN OREGON

futp60_rgbWelcome! Over 725 schools in Oregon and 73,000 schools nationwide have joined Fuel Up to Play 60. Fuel Up to Play 60 is a fun, free, school-wide wellness program that encourages youth empowerment and leadership to promote healthy eating and physical activity initiatives.  Oregon schools benefit from grant funding opportunities. Website

We are your local Oregon team-here to support your school nutrition programs and wellness efforts.


Crista HawkinsCrista Hawkins, RDN, LD
Director of School Programs
chawkins@odncouncil.org
Direct: 971-673-2725

 


erin-hirte_300pxErin Hirte, RDN, LD
Manager of School Programs
ehirte@odncouncil.org
Direct: 971-673-2729

 

2016 STUDENT AMBASSADOR SUMMIT
Check out this highlights video from our 2016 Summit at Purdue University.


MILK COOLERS FOR COACHES

FUTP60 Cooler Front with Dispensing LidPower up your team with delicious, nutritious milk. Apply now for a free cooler and travel cart that holds 50 cartons. Must be a Fuel Up to Play 60 school to apply. We can help you with this step! Contact us.

 

 


CHEESE TOOLKIT OFFER

cheese-tool-kitWe are offering to ship the Oregon Harvest Cheese Poster for your schools at no charge. In the future, these posters will be available to download with the other posters and toolkits on the Oregon Department of Education’s Oregon Harvest for Schools website.

Oregon School District Nutrition Directors [order here]

 

pizza_recipes_food_service_detailAs an added bonus, check out the delicious pizza recipes for your school nutrition programs created by Executive Chef Jason Morse. They use whole grain dough and many local foods, specifically for schools. The home version is also available to share with families — a great way to involve students and foster school/home connections to support wellness. You will receive printed copies of these recipes in protective sleeves for your schools along with posters. In the meantime, both versions are available here.


Oregon-School-Wellness-AwardsThree outstanding Oregon schools are selected each year for exemplary wellness work. Since 2008, the Oregon Department of Education, with sponsorship from Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council and support from the Nutrition Council of Oregon has recognized winning schools across the state for creatively promoting nutrition and physical activity. Read more about the School Wellness Award and view list of winning schools.


action-for-healthy-kids_nationalAction for Healthy Kids is the nation’s leading nonprofit and largest volunteer network fighting childhood obesity and undernourishment by partnering with schools to improve nutrition and physical activity to help our kids learn to eat right, be active every day, and be ready to learn.

The Oregon Action for Healthy Kids Team is looking to engage new members that can help the Team continue to do great work in Oregon. Oregon team webpage

RESOURCES

resource downloads page

TASTE AND HEALTH

SPORTS NUTRITION

ADULTS

Is dairy good for you?

Protein Fact Sheets

Science Summaries

MEALTIME

Mealtime Mini Poster

Mealtime Fact Sheets

Mealtime Fact Sheets for Families with Young Children

Healthy Beverages

Mealtime for Adults

MYPLATE


ON THE FARM

Caring for the Environment

Local, Safe, High Quality Dairy Products

Other topics


SCHOOLS

Quantity Recipes

School Wellness Newsletters


KIDS CORNER

What’s a Dairy Farm?

Puzzles, Games and Coloring Sheets

Polly Pride the Dairy Cow

Puzzle Solutions


DAIRY IN OREGON


NEWS AND EVENTS

NEWS AND EVENTS

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Whether you’re a reporter or just curious about what’s happening in the world of dairy in Oregon, welcome! Here you’ll find information, details and resources about our news and events. Not finding what you’re looking for? Just contact Josh Thomas, Senior Director of Communications, at jthomas@odncouncil.org, 971-673-2730 or 503-317-5007.


Then and Now: Delivering for Oregon Dairy
ANNUAL REPORT | February 15, 2018


 

New School Meals on the Menu for Oregon Students
NEWS RELEASE | April 4, 2018
The words “school cafeteria food” are taking on new meaning as Chef Garrett Berdan is training a growing number of child nutrition program professionals to prepare delicious and nutritious food for Oregon students.

 

Portland’s Milk Carton Boat Race Returns June 24
NEWS RELEASE | February 28, 2018
A unique Portland tradition dating back to 1973, the Royal Rosarians Milk Carton Boat Race will welcome boaters back to the historic Westmoreland Park Casting Pond on Sunday, June 24, 2018. The Rose Festival event will be produced by the Royal Rosarians and presented by the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council.

 

Stephanie Breazile Crowned 59th Oregon Dairy Princess-Ambassador
NEWS RELEASE | January 28, 2018
Stephanie Breazile representing Linn and Benton Counties, was crowned the 2018 Oregon Dairy Princess-Ambassador. She was among five county contestants vying for the 2018 title. Breazile is looking forward to a busy year informing and educating the public about the dairy industry.

 

Stacy Foster Selected to Manage Oregon Dairy Industry Relations
NEWS RELEASE | October 31, 2017
With more than a decade of experience leading farm tours for thousands of students, teachers and parents at a nationally recognized Oregon dairy, Stacy Foster knows a thing or two about dairy farming. [more]

 

Summit Aims to Advance Rogue Valley Health, Wellness, Education
NEWS RELEASE | October 24, 2017
Improving student performance and advancing a culture of health and wellness will be the emphasis for a first-of-its kind summit for the Rogue Valley. [more]

 

Milk celebrated as official beverage of Oregon, OSAA
NEWS RELEASE | September 27, 2017
Today, the Oregon School Activities Association recognized Oregon’s dairy farm families for their ongoing support of the state’s schools, coaches and athletes. An open thank you note to dairy farmers was posted on the OSAA’s social media accounts, recognizing the 20th anniversary of milk as Oregon’s state beverage. [more]

 

Oregon Dairy Farm Receives National Sustainability Award
NEWS RELEASE | June 29, 2017
Rickreall Dairy Lauded for Farming with Innovation and Heart
Rickreall Dairy is the first Oregon farm to receive the national Outstanding Dairy Farm Sustainability Award. It was one of only three selected nationwide, and the only one west of the Mississippi River. [more]

 

Dairy Farms and Businesses are Advancing Sustainable Practices, from Farm to Table
NEWS RELEASE | June 29, 2017
Winners announced for sixth annual U.S. Dairy Sustainability Awards, progress report released
The Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy announced its sixth annual U.S. Dairy Sustainability Awards in a June 28 Chicago ceremony. The program recognizes dairy farms, businesses and partnerships whose practices improve the well-being of people, animals and the planet. [more]

 

Martin Luther King K-8 Receives Second Learning Lab in Oregon
NEWS RELEASE | April 3, 2017
The second iPad Learning Lab donation to an Oregon public school is being presented to Martin Luther King K-8 at a special assembly on Monday, April 3rd, at 2:15pm. The donation was made possible through Jacksons Food Stores’ “Milk Builds Strong Schools” campaign

 

Tillamook County Creamery Association gives $1.5 million for new research facility at OSU
NEWS RELEASE | January 25, 2017
The Tillamook County Creamery Association (TCCA) has announced a gift of $1.5 million to support construction of a new Food and Beverage Facility at Oregon State University. The planned facility will include space for innovative research, testing and teaching …

 

erin-hirte_300pxErin Hirte Brings Experience, Expertise to School Programs
NEWS RELEASE | October 27, 2016
As a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist with experience in school foodservice management and child nutrition programs, Erin Hirte is hitting the ground running as the new Manager of School Programs for the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council. [more]

 

culinary-training_hermiston_2016_100x100Cooking Up New and Nutritious Recipes for Local School Kids
NEWS RELEASE | September 21, 2016
“What’s for lunch?” It’s a common refrain in school cafeterias in Hermiston and across the state, and some tasty plans are in the works to provide exciting new and nutritious menu items. [more]

 

Student Lily Sweet Representing Oregon at National SummitStudent Lily Sweet Representing Oregon at National Summit
NEWS RELEASE | July 22, 2016
Early on Sunday morning, sixth-grader Lily Sweet leaves Portland for Purdue University in Indiana, where she will represent Oregon at the national Fuel Up to Play 60 Student Ambassador Summit. As Oregon’s 2016-2017 Fuel Up to Play 60 State Ambassador, she will attend with [more]

 

FUTP60_PASummit2016_P137Summit Connects Agriculture, Healthy Eating and Learning
NEWS RELEASE | June 24, 2016
It’s a bird, it’s a plane! No, it’s a teacher flying through the air on a zip line. The Northwest Regional Fuel Up to Play 60 Summit is going to new heights on Monday, June 27, at Tree to Tree Aerial Adventure Park. On the first day of a two day summit, a unique mix of educational and [more]

 

houck-middle-schoolLiteracy Night at Houck Middle School Features Former NFL Player
MEDIA ADVISORY | May 25, 2016
At Houck Middle School in Salem, Anthony Newman will talk with students about the importance of perseverance, accountability, courtesy and kinship tomorrow during a special Literacy Night presentation. Inspired and led by youth, Fuel Up to Play 60 is an in-school nutrition and [more]

 

milk-carton-boat-race-200pxPortland’s Milk Carton Boat Race Returns
NEWS RELEASE | May 17, 2016
A unique Portland tradition dating back to 1973, the Milk Carton Boat Race will welcome boaters back to the historic Westmoreland Park Casting Pond on Sunday, June 26. The Rose Festival sanctioned event will be produced by the Royal Rosarians and sponsored by the [more]

 

futp60-ontario-high-assemblyPro Quarterback Promoting Youth Wellness in Ontario
MEDIA ADVISORY | April 11, 2016
He’s a quarterback for the San Diego Chargers and a homegrown success story that goes back to setting records at Burns High School and playing for the University of Oregon. You’re invited to welcome Kellen Clemens back to his eastern Oregon roots for a special [more]

 

odnc-logo-websiteOregon Dairy Products Commission Unveils New Name, Logo
NEWS RELEASE | January 5, 2016
Along with the start of the new year, the Oregon Dairy Products Commission has unveiled a new name and logo, which will help the organization better position its key commitments to schools, child and community health and wellness, industry relations and consumer communications. [more]

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