Tag Archives: cheese

DASH into the New Year for a Healthier You

by Josie Oleson, Oregon Health & Science University Dietetic Intern

Having trouble setting a New Year’s resolution? Why not DASH into 2018 by eating better and working toward a healthier you?

Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, or DASH, emphasizes dairy, fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean protein as part of a balanced diet to reduce high blood pressure and improve health. Cheese, milk, and yogurt provide essential nutrients like calcium, potassium and magnesium that are key in making the DASH diet work.

For eight years, DASH has been ranked the Best Diet Overall diet by U.S. News and World Report. In 2018, the eating plan also topped the “healthy eating” and “heart disease prevention” categories.

The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association recently lowered the recommendations for what it means to have high blood pressure. This change will increase the number of people with elevated or high blood pressure, but this also means that people will be able to fight back sooner by changing their diet and getting more exercise. This is what the DASH diet was originally designed to do, but it’s also a healthy way of eating that is recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Want to kick-start your DASH resolution?

Take the Rate Your Plate Quiz and get started with this 4-step plan.


Try this new DASH recipe – White Chicken Chili

 

 

 

 


Find more recipes.

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Oregon’s Newest Creamery Invites You to the Farm

A new farm-to-table experience is coming soon, where you’ll be able to meet the cows that make the milk for your artisan cheese and watch skilled cheesemakers in action.

TMK Farm and Creamery is located about a half hour from Portland in Canby, Oregon. It is a small family farm that began 30 years ago when owner Todd Koch purchased his first Holstein cow. “It all started with a 4-H project that went too far,” he said. “I was supposed to sell that cow, but I kept her and the rest is history.”

By 1997, the milking herd had grown, so the Koch family built TMK Dairy. This year, they built a commercial creamery where Koch’s sister Shauna and brother-in-law Bert Garza began making farmstead cheeses.

As described on the farm’s website, the new state-of-the-art creamery on the dairy property “allows for an immersive experience for their guests that provides a transparent look at farmstead cheese-making, lets you meet the cows [and] explore the farm.”

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While the herd of 20 cows is relatively small by comparison to other Oregon dairies, like dairy farms of all sizes, TMK demonstrates great care and stewardship for their animals, natural resources, employees and their community.

The creamery is already operating, selling mostly to local stores and restaurants/wineries, with plans to open a boutique tasting room, store and patio on the site of the creamery where you can sample artisan cheese while watching the cheesemakers through large observation windows.

Currently, farm tours are offered any day of the week by appointment. You can check out more from TMK by visiting their Facebook page @TMKfarms, web page www.tmkfarms.com or by calling 503-705-2550.

Dairy Princess Ambassador Goes International

Linn and Benton Counties Dairy Princess Ambassador Stephanie Breazile recaps her travels to dairies abroad, noting similarities and differences.

My name is Stephanie Breazile, and I am the 2017 Linn and Benton Counties Dairy Princess Ambassador. I am currently attending Oregon State University majoring in Agricultural Sciences with a minor in Leadership to become a high school agricultural education instructor.

At the beginning of the summer, I attended a two-week study abroad program in England through the College of Agricultural Sciences. We spent one week in Nottingham and the last week in and around Cheltenham. One on the main things that we focused on throughout the two weeks was the dairy industry.

I was able to visit the University of Nottingham – Sutton Bonington Campus Dairy. This is a commercial dairy that is also used for research for the school. There were four robotic milking machines, one of which was used for the research cattle. The main research that was being done was feed trials, which Oregon State University does as well. One thing that surprised me at the dairy was that they still manually push the feed for the cows, when it seems that many dairies in Oregon are getting automatic feed pushers.

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I also was able to go to Westcomb Dairy, which also has their own creamery. We were able to go into their cheese cellar where their cheddar cheese aged. Their cheese ranged from 12 months to 24 months. They also had a machine that automatically flipped the cheese blocks so employees did not have to do that.

England is adding more technology to their dairy industry to become more efficient and have less human input because there isn’t enough people that want to work on dairy farms, much like here.

Being able to attend this study abroad program was very rewarding, and I learned so much more about the dairy industry as a whole. I will now be able to use the knowledge I gained as I share the story of milk as a Dairy Princess Ambassador and to future students as a high school agricultural education instructor.

The Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council is a proud sponsor of the Oregon Dairy Princess Ambassador program. Learn more about the program at oregondairywomen.com/dairy-princess.

Bean and Smoked Cheddar Salad

Bean and Smoked Cheddar Salad
This tasty bean salad comes together in no time, and the smokey cheddar adds bonus flavor. No smoked cheddar? Try using sharp cheddar or pepper jack.

Serves 4

dash-recipehealthy-recipeentree-recipeSide dish recipe

 

 

Dietitian’s Tip: Build a DASH meal with this salad by adding a side of fresh fruit and a whole grain roll

INGREDIENTS
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
¼ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon sugar
¼ teaspoon black pepper
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
¼ cup red onion, minced
½ cup celery, sliced
2 15-ounce can 50% less sodium beans (garbanzo, kidney or black), drained and rinsed
4 ounces smoked Cheddar cheese, cut into ¼ inch cubes

INSTRUCTIONS
In a large bowl combine Dijon mustard, cider vinegar, salt, sugar, black pepper and olive oil: whisk until well mixed.
Add remaining ingredients to large bowl with vinaigrette and mix until evenly coated. Serve chilled or at room temperature.

NUTRITIONAL FACTS
Per serving: 240 Calories, 11 g total fat, 4 g saturated fat, 310 mg sodium, 23 g carbohydrates, 8 g fiber, 12 g protein, 192 mg calcium

Southeast Asia Dairy Trade Mission Updates

Asia's buying power

Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam   |   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia   |   Singapore

April 22 – May 4, 2017

The following are updates provided by Pete Kent, Executive Director of the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council, from the 2017 Dairy Trade Mission to Southeast Asia.


MAY 11, 2017

Following on the successful trade mission to Southeast Asia, Pete Kent sat down with Mateusz Perkowski, of the Capital Press to provide a recap and discuss next steps for delivering dairy products from the western United States to new markets in Vietnam, Singapore and Malaysia.

Oregon dairy industry builds trade ‘pipeline’ to SE Asia
Capital Press, May 11


MAY 3, 2017

As we come toward the conclusion of our Southeast Asia Dairy Trade Mission, we discover artisan cheeses and ice cream from the western states are showing up in Malaysia and Singapore high-end grocery stores. These are but two dairy products currently being shipped to the region by U.S. dairy companies.

Southeast-Asia-grocery-store-cheese-room

Britton Welsh, cheese maker for Utah’s Beehive Cheese, stands with Jason’s Grocers cheese manager, in front of a selection of cheeses from Beehive Cheese.

As we’ve seen in hotels, restaurants and grocers, natural cheeses are increasingly being consumed by a growing middle class. Even whole cheese rooms are now present in the higher end stores, which feature artisan and specialty cheeses worldwide. Still, the selection of U.S. cheeses is sparse.

On our 14-day mission, which we complete this week, we’ve visited with importers, store managers, U.S. Dairy Export Council representatives, and agricultural trade officers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. All have pointed to growing opportunities for U.S. dairy products in several product categories for the region.

Upon our return, we will be working as a region to further plan our next steps in developing a collaborative effort to help open the channels to new markets, especially for our western region’s small to medium sized companies and dairy cooperatives.


APRIL 28, 2017

In day seven of our SE Asia Dairy Trade Mission, we’re struck by the number of construction cranes that line the skyline as we complete our first day in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

We arrived here in a very early morning, after completing four days in Vietnam, including the 2017 Food and Hotel Vietnam trade show. There we were able to sample our cheeses, in addition to viewing other dairy innovations from worldwide.

Trade shows such as Food and Hotel Vietnam allow for key connections, sample testing, and a look at other dairy innovations produced worldwide including cheese candy, smoked butter, and specially formulated barista milk.

In Malaysia, the building growth is just one indication of the economic growth in this ASEAN nation, where we are seeking new export opportunities for western dairy states.

Today in between drenching rain storms, we visited with importing food distributors, who service the growing segment of high-end restaurants, hotels, and quick serve restaurants.

Our goal is to further the connections we’ve made in the past year, with particular emphasis on artisan cheeses and dairy ingredients. While U.S. dairy is still relatively absent in these emerging nations, the desire for U.S. dairy products is increasingly becoming stronger.


APRIL 26, 2017

A growing population, increasing middle class, and one of the world’s faster growing economies make Vietnam a key country of interest for potential growth in U.S. dairy exports.

The country is the first stop of a Southeast Asia dairy trade mission, now underway. Attended by 14 representatives of dairy processors, supporting agencies and organizations from Oregon, Washington, Utah and Arizona, the mission begins with Food and Hotel Vietnam. The three-day trade event includes the U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC) exhibit of which we are a part.

From here, we’ll travel to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and then on to Singapore to complete our 14-day trade mission. With more than 30 meetings, events, and activities scheduled, our goal is to help expand markets for U.S. dairy in collaboration with USDEC, with an emphasis on artisan cheese and dairy ingredients.


RELATED STORIES:

Exploring New Markets for Dairy Exports

Oregon dairy trade mission 2017

As you read this sentence, a delegation of 14 dairy industry and trade representatives from Oregon, Washington, Utah and Arizona are exploring new business opportunities in Southeast Asia. The Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council organized this dairy trade mission to include Vietnam, Malaysia and Singapore.

The purpose of this mission is to explore new markets and connections for exports of dairy products from Oregon and the other participating states. A full slate of meetings and visits are scheduled with government, retail, factory, trade and logistics contacts, fittingly returning during World Trade Month on May 4.

On a global scale, overall demand for dairy products continues to grow. For example, in the cheese category alone there is a projected 25% volume growth of all global cheese trade by 2021, equivalent to an additional 500,000 metric tons. Most of the projected potential lies with developing countries where growing populations, rising incomes, expansion of the middle class and greater desire for western diets is driving demand.

Dairy is Oregon’s fourth largest agricultural commodity in Oregon by value with a total economic impact of more than a billion dollars. Exports of Oregon dairy products totaled $93,662,000 in 2014. Approximately 80 percent of the dairy products made in Oregon are produced for other domestic or international markets. Previous trade missions have opened doors in South Korea and Japan.

Pete Kent, Executive Director of the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council, will be sharing insights from the trade mission on this website and through our social media accounts along the way.

RELATED STORIES:

Mushroom Cheddar Soup

Mushroom Cheese Soup
This cheesy and creamy soup is for you, whether you are lactose intolerant or not.

Serves 9

indulgent-recipeentree-recipe

 

 

Dietitian’s tip: Use either whole milk or lactose-free whole milk. Cheddar cheese, like all aged cheeses, contains very little lactose so you can enjoy without symptoms. For a healthy balance to your meal, accompany this treat with a side salad or roasted vegetables.

Prep time: 10 min   Cook time: 30 min

INGREDIENTS
Sliced baby portabella mushrooms
1 cup yellow onion, peeled, sliced
1 tablespoon garlic, peeled, minced
1 tablespoon vegetable oill
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 cup butter
1/4 cup flour
2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
2 cups lactose-free whole milk
2 cups shredded cheddar

INSTRUCTIONS
In a large sauce pan, sauté mushrooms, onion, and garlic in vegetable oil over medium heat, for 3 to 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

Add butter to pan and melt over medium heat; add flour, stirring constantly for 2 to 3 minutes or until incorporated.

Gradually add chicken broth and milk, stirring until incorporated; bring to a boil over medium-high heat.

Reduce to a simmer over medium-low heat; cook for 10 to 15 minutes or until soup is thickened.

Stir in cheddar cheese and simmer for an additional 3 to 5 minutes or until cheese is melted.

Tip: Soup can be made up to one day in advance, and reheated

NUTRITIONAL FACTS
Per serving: Calories 210, Total Fat 14g 22%, Saturated Fat 7g 35 %, Trans Fat 0g, Cholestrol 35mg 12%, Sodium 290mg 12%, Total Carbohydrate 10g 3%, Dietary Fiber 1g 4%, Sugars 3g

Recipe Courtesy of National Dairy Council®

Harvest Cheddar Tart

Cheddar Apple Pear Tart
Apples, pears and cheese have always been a classic trio. Take them to the next level with this sweet treat.

Serves 6

indulgent-recipeDessert recipe

 

 

Dietitian’s Tip: With an indulgent dessert like this on the menu, plan ahead and enjoy a low calorie and low fat meal first.

Prep time: 5 min   Cook time: 10 min

INGREDIENTS
6 puff pastry shells
1 Bartlett pear, stemmed, cored, chopped
1 red apple, stemmed, cored, chopped
1 tablespoon butter
1/2 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
6 tablespoons (1.5 ounces) aged Cheddar cheese, shredded
6 teaspoons caramel sauce

INSTRUCTIONS
Preheat oven to 350 F degrees

Bake puff pastry shells according to the package directions.

In a medium skillet, cook pear and apple in butter for 5 to 7 minutes or until tender; sprinkle with pumpkin pie spice.

Fill each puff pastry cup with 2 tablespoons fruit; top with 1 tablespoon shredded cheese.

Bake tart for 2 to 3 minutes or until cheese is melted.

Serve tart with 1 teaspoon caramel sauce.

Tip: Classic Cheddar cheese may be substituted in place of aged Cheddar cheese.

NUTRITIONAL FACTS
Per serving: Calories 290, Total Fat 18g 28%, Saturated Fat 6g 30 %, Trans Fat 0g, Cholesterol 15mg 5%, Sodium 290mg 12%, Total Carbohydrate 29g 10%, Dietary Fiber 2g 8%, Sugars 10g, Protein 6g

Recipe Courtesy of National Dairy Council®

Beef and Broccoli Stroganoff

Try this lighter twist on a classic creamy dish.  Make it a meal with fresh fruit and a cold glass of milk.

Serves 4

healthy-recipeentree-recipe

 

 

Prep time: 15 minutes  Cook time: 20 minutes

Ingredients
3/4 pound beef sirloin, thinly sliced
2 1/2cups broccoli florets
10 large mushrooms, sliced
2 green onions, sliced
2 cloves garlic, minced
3 tablespoons flour
1 cup 1% lowfat milk
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1/2 cup dry white wine or water
1 1/2cup fat-free sour cream
1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, grated
4 cups cooked brown rice

Preparation
In a large nonstick skillet, stir-fry beef until browned. Add vegetables, onions and garlic.

Stir-fry over medium heat 3-5 minutes.

Add flour and stir to coat all vegetables. Stir in milk and soy sauce; cook and stir until mixture is thickened and bubbly.

Add wine or water. Gradually add sour cream and parmesan cheese. Cook over medium heat until just heated through; do not boil.

Serve over rice.

Nutrition Information
Per serving: 540 calories, 13 g total fat, 5 g saturated fat, 400 mg sodium, 72 g carbohydrates, 5 g fiber, 34 g protein, 340 mg calcium

Provided by: Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council

Improving Nutrition, Healthcare Outcomes in Older Adults

Nationwide, up to 60 percent of hospitalized older adults may be malnourished, with an estimated price tag of $51.3 billion. It is no surprise that a 300 percent increase in health care costs can be attributed to poor nutrition status.  In Oregon, Registered Dietitian Nutritionists are in the forefront of the fight to prevent and treat malnutrition.

Partnering with nutrition leaders, Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council is working to raise awareness and has gathered educational tools to help health professionals recognize and treat malnutrition. The resources also help older adults realize that they need to ask about nutrition and advocate for improved care.ask-about-your-nutrition

Oregon Governor Kate Brown joined the Oregon Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in shining the light on the impact of malnutrition – especially in older adults – by proclaiming September 26 to 30 as Malnutrition Awareness Week in Oregon.

Preventing and treating malnutrition can be as simple as following the MyPlate guidelines.  Eating enough food and the right amounts from each food group is the key. Protein is especially important.

Everyone, and especially those at risk of malnutrition such as the ill or elderly, should aim to consume 3-4 ounces of protein at each meal (30 grams). Protein-rich dairy foods are a convenient, affordable and tasty option for seniors.  Try milk (lactose-free, if needed), cheese, Greek yogurt, yogurt and cottage cheese.  Find out what a serving is and how you can get enough with these fact sheets:

Protein Pointers

Eating to Optimize Surgery or Treatment

Eating to Meet Your Body’s Needs

Eating for Your Best Health

Malnutrition awareness is important. Learn more about this issue at this link to a KPTV television story with Providence nutrition services.

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