Tag Archives: cheese

Pear Quesadillas

Food Hero has a wealth of easy to make, nutritious recipes to liven up your summer days. Here is an easy summer lunch idea for the kids … or yourself.

Serves 4

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Dietitian’s Tip: This recipe is a great addition to a healthy diet serving up dairy protein, fruit, vegetables, and whole grains. Come up with your own combination using different fruits and vegetables.

 

INGREDIENTS

4 medium whole wheat tortillas
1 cup grated cheese (try cheddar, jack, or pepper jack)
1 cup pear slices (fresh or canned/drained)
½ cup finely chopped green or red peppers
2 tablespoons minced onion (green, red, or yellow)

 

INSTRUCTIONS

Lay two tortillas on two plates.

Divide the cheese between the two tortillas.

Divide the pears, peppers, and onion between the two tortillas.

Top with remaining two tortillas.

Heat a skillet or griddle to medium (300 degrees in an electric skillet). Place one quesadilla in pan. Cook 2-4 minutes, or until bottom of quesadilla begins to look a little brown.

With large spatula, gently turn the quesadilla over and cook the other side until a little brown, 2-4 minutes.

Gently slide quesadilla onto a plate. Cook the second quesadilla.

Cut each cooked quesadilla into 4 pieces and serve.

 

NUTRITIONAL FACTS

Per serving: 250 calories, 8 g total fat, 3.5 g saturated fat, 31 g carbohydrate, 11 g protein, 4 g dietary fiber, 400 mg sodium

Recipe courtesy of Food Hero

Western States Introducing Dairy to SE Asia

Cheese and ice cream … what better way to further introduce U.S. western dairy foods to Southeast Asia, the world’s fourth largest economy?

During the week prior to the start of May World Trade Month, four western states – Oregon, Washington, Utah, and Arizona – collaborated to present cheese, ice cream, butter and milk powder ingredients to some 80,000 attendees of the Food and Hotel Asia show in Singapore.

As part of the U.S. Dairy Export Council’s (USDEC) trade show booth, coordinated by the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council, western dairy processors presented a sampling of the quality and excellence of U.S. dairy foods available to this growing market.

Several cheese varieties from the group were on display and sampled during USDEC’s Tuesday evening cheese sampling reception. Throughout the trade show, several potential buyers inquired about products, and sampled both cheese and ice cream.

Participation in this show follows other recent inbound and outbound trade missions coordinated by the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council to build new markets for exports of regional dairy products.

 

Future Chefs Learn Good Cheese Starts with the Cows

This week, a group of 13 aspiring chefs from Oregon Culinary Institute took a closer look at where cheese comes from by taking a field trip to the source. They visited TMK Farm and Creamery, a 20 cow dairy and boutique creamery located in Canby, Oregon.

“We support the farm to table movement by providing chefs and culinary students with the opportunity to visit a dairy farm,” said Anne Goetze, Sr. Director of Nutrition Affairs for the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council. “It was a perfect match, and they learned firsthand about all of the factors that go into producing high quality milk and dairy foods, including care for animals, land, water and air.”

Between milking cows and making cheese, it was truly an opportunity for hands-on learning. TMK Creamery hosted a cheese making class where students were able to join in the entire process of making queso fresco cheese. Queso fresco, which translates as “fresh cheese,” is the most widely used cheese in Mexican cooking.

From cutting the curds, draining the whey and actually milking the cow, all the steps were included. Education is the goal for TMK. They want students, especially in the culinary world to understand not only the process, but also the passion behind their artisan cheese.

“It all starts with a quality milk,” says Bert Garza, who makes the cheese alongside his wife Shauna, “and to get quality milk, you need to be caring for your animals.”

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RELATED LINKS:

TMK Farms and Creamery

Oregon Culinary Institute

Artichoke Jalapeno Dip

Score Points with this Super Artichoke Dip.

Word on the street is there’s going to be a pretty big football game televised this Sunday. One might even call it “super,” with the express written consent of the National Football League, of course.

No plan yet for your big game watch party? Kick it off with this artichoke dip that’s sure to score points with your guests. It’ll be super in a bowl, or on a plate, and will stand apart in a crowded field of game day snacks and appetizers.

Yields 2 cups

dash-recipehealthy-recipeSide dish recipe

 

 

Dietitian’s Tip: 

  • Scoop onto crunchy carrot sticks, cucumbers, radishes, or jicama
  • Serve with whole grain crackers
  • Dip left over? Spread on whole grain toast for a healthy snack

 

INGREDIENTS

1 ½ cup plain Greek-style yogurt or plain yogurt, strained*
1 cup canned water-packed artichoke hearts, drained, patted dry, chopped
¼ cup grated parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons fresh jalapeno chili, minced
½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon black pepper

 

INSTRUCTIONS

Mix ingredients together. Cover and refrigerate a couple hours before serving.

Follow the link to LiveBest for directions to strain plain yogurt.

 

NUTRITIONAL FACTS

Per ¼ cup serving: 57 calories, 1 g total fat, 0.5 g saturated fat, 6 g carbohydrate, 4 g protein, 1 g fiber, 228 mg sodium, 168 mg potassium, 16 mg magnesium, 123 mg calcium

 

Recipe courtesy of LiveBest

DASH into the New Year for a Healthier You

by Josie Oleson, Oregon Health & Science University Dietetic Intern

Having trouble setting a New Year’s resolution? Why not DASH into 2018 by eating better and working toward a healthier you?

Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, or DASH, emphasizes dairy, fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean protein as part of a balanced diet to reduce high blood pressure and improve health. Cheese, milk, and yogurt provide essential nutrients like calcium, potassium and magnesium that are key in making the DASH diet work.

For eight years, DASH has been ranked the Best Diet Overall diet by U.S. News and World Report. In 2018, the eating plan also topped the “healthy eating” and “heart disease prevention” categories.

The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association recently lowered the recommendations for what it means to have high blood pressure. This change will increase the number of people with elevated or high blood pressure, but this also means that people will be able to fight back sooner by changing their diet and getting more exercise. This is what the DASH diet was originally designed to do, but it’s also a healthy way of eating that is recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Want to kick-start your DASH resolution?

Take the Rate Your Plate Quiz and get started with this 4-step plan.


Try this new DASH recipe – White Chicken Chili

 

 

 

 


Find more recipes.

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Oregon’s Newest Creamery Invites You to the Farm

A new farm-to-table experience is coming soon, where you’ll be able to meet the cows that make the milk for your artisan cheese and watch skilled cheesemakers in action.

TMK Farm and Creamery is located about a half hour from Portland in Canby, Oregon. It is a small family farm that began 30 years ago when owner Todd Koch purchased his first Holstein cow. “It all started with a 4-H project that went too far,” he said. “I was supposed to sell that cow, but I kept her and the rest is history.”

By 1997, the milking herd had grown, so the Koch family built TMK Dairy. This year, they built a commercial creamery where Koch’s sister Shauna and brother-in-law Bert Garza began making farmstead cheeses.

As described on the farm’s website, the new state-of-the-art creamery on the dairy property “allows for an immersive experience for their guests that provides a transparent look at farmstead cheese-making, lets you meet the cows [and] explore the farm.”

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While the herd of 20 cows is relatively small by comparison to other Oregon dairies, like dairy farms of all sizes, TMK demonstrates great care and stewardship for their animals, natural resources, employees and their community.

The creamery is already operating, selling mostly to local stores and restaurants/wineries, with plans to open a boutique tasting room, store and patio on the site of the creamery where you can sample artisan cheese while watching the cheesemakers through large observation windows.

Currently, farm tours are offered any day of the week by appointment. You can check out more from TMK by visiting their Facebook page @TMKfarms, web page www.tmkfarms.com or by calling 503-705-2550.

Dairy Princess Ambassador Goes International

Linn and Benton Counties Dairy Princess Ambassador Stephanie Breazile recaps her travels to dairies abroad, noting similarities and differences.

My name is Stephanie Breazile, and I am the 2017 Linn and Benton Counties Dairy Princess Ambassador. I am currently attending Oregon State University majoring in Agricultural Sciences with a minor in Leadership to become a high school agricultural education instructor.

At the beginning of the summer, I attended a two-week study abroad program in England through the College of Agricultural Sciences. We spent one week in Nottingham and the last week in and around Cheltenham. One on the main things that we focused on throughout the two weeks was the dairy industry.

I was able to visit the University of Nottingham – Sutton Bonington Campus Dairy. This is a commercial dairy that is also used for research for the school. There were four robotic milking machines, one of which was used for the research cattle. The main research that was being done was feed trials, which Oregon State University does as well. One thing that surprised me at the dairy was that they still manually push the feed for the cows, when it seems that many dairies in Oregon are getting automatic feed pushers.

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I also was able to go to Westcomb Dairy, which also has their own creamery. We were able to go into their cheese cellar where their cheddar cheese aged. Their cheese ranged from 12 months to 24 months. They also had a machine that automatically flipped the cheese blocks so employees did not have to do that.

England is adding more technology to their dairy industry to become more efficient and have less human input because there isn’t enough people that want to work on dairy farms, much like here.

Being able to attend this study abroad program was very rewarding, and I learned so much more about the dairy industry as a whole. I will now be able to use the knowledge I gained as I share the story of milk as a Dairy Princess Ambassador and to future students as a high school agricultural education instructor.

The Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council is a proud sponsor of the Oregon Dairy Princess Ambassador program. Learn more about the program at oregondairywomen.com/dairy-princess.

Bean and Smoked Cheddar Salad

Bean and Smoked Cheddar Salad
This tasty bean salad comes together in no time, and the smokey cheddar adds bonus flavor. No smoked cheddar? Try using sharp cheddar or pepper jack.

Serves 4

dash-recipehealthy-recipeentree-recipeSide dish recipe

 

 

Dietitian’s Tip: Build a DASH meal with this salad by adding a side of fresh fruit and a whole grain roll

INGREDIENTS
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
¼ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon sugar
¼ teaspoon black pepper
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
¼ cup red onion, minced
½ cup celery, sliced
2 15-ounce can 50% less sodium beans (garbanzo, kidney or black), drained and rinsed
4 ounces smoked Cheddar cheese, cut into ¼ inch cubes

INSTRUCTIONS
In a large bowl combine Dijon mustard, cider vinegar, salt, sugar, black pepper and olive oil: whisk until well mixed.
Add remaining ingredients to large bowl with vinaigrette and mix until evenly coated. Serve chilled or at room temperature.

NUTRITIONAL FACTS
Per serving: 240 Calories, 11 g total fat, 4 g saturated fat, 310 mg sodium, 23 g carbohydrates, 8 g fiber, 12 g protein, 192 mg calcium

Southeast Asia Dairy Trade Mission Updates

Asia's buying power

Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam   |   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia   |   Singapore

April 22 – May 4, 2017

The following are updates provided by Pete Kent, Executive Director of the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council, from the 2017 Dairy Trade Mission to Southeast Asia.


MAY 11, 2017

Following on the successful trade mission to Southeast Asia, Pete Kent sat down with Mateusz Perkowski, of the Capital Press to provide a recap and discuss next steps for delivering dairy products from the western United States to new markets in Vietnam, Singapore and Malaysia.

Oregon dairy industry builds trade ‘pipeline’ to SE Asia
Capital Press, May 11


MAY 3, 2017

As we come toward the conclusion of our Southeast Asia Dairy Trade Mission, we discover artisan cheeses and ice cream from the western states are showing up in Malaysia and Singapore high-end grocery stores. These are but two dairy products currently being shipped to the region by U.S. dairy companies.

Southeast-Asia-grocery-store-cheese-room

Britton Welsh, cheese maker for Utah’s Beehive Cheese, stands with Jason’s Grocers cheese manager, in front of a selection of cheeses from Beehive Cheese.

As we’ve seen in hotels, restaurants and grocers, natural cheeses are increasingly being consumed by a growing middle class. Even whole cheese rooms are now present in the higher end stores, which feature artisan and specialty cheeses worldwide. Still, the selection of U.S. cheeses is sparse.

On our 14-day mission, which we complete this week, we’ve visited with importers, store managers, U.S. Dairy Export Council representatives, and agricultural trade officers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. All have pointed to growing opportunities for U.S. dairy products in several product categories for the region.

Upon our return, we will be working as a region to further plan our next steps in developing a collaborative effort to help open the channels to new markets, especially for our western region’s small to medium sized companies and dairy cooperatives.


APRIL 28, 2017

In day seven of our SE Asia Dairy Trade Mission, we’re struck by the number of construction cranes that line the skyline as we complete our first day in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

We arrived here in a very early morning, after completing four days in Vietnam, including the 2017 Food and Hotel Vietnam trade show. There we were able to sample our cheeses, in addition to viewing other dairy innovations from worldwide.

Trade shows such as Food and Hotel Vietnam allow for key connections, sample testing, and a look at other dairy innovations produced worldwide including cheese candy, smoked butter, and specially formulated barista milk.

In Malaysia, the building growth is just one indication of the economic growth in this ASEAN nation, where we are seeking new export opportunities for western dairy states.

Today in between drenching rain storms, we visited with importing food distributors, who service the growing segment of high-end restaurants, hotels, and quick serve restaurants.

Our goal is to further the connections we’ve made in the past year, with particular emphasis on artisan cheeses and dairy ingredients. While U.S. dairy is still relatively absent in these emerging nations, the desire for U.S. dairy products is increasingly becoming stronger.


APRIL 26, 2017

A growing population, increasing middle class, and one of the world’s faster growing economies make Vietnam a key country of interest for potential growth in U.S. dairy exports.

The country is the first stop of a Southeast Asia dairy trade mission, now underway. Attended by 14 representatives of dairy processors, supporting agencies and organizations from Oregon, Washington, Utah and Arizona, the mission begins with Food and Hotel Vietnam. The three-day trade event includes the U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC) exhibit of which we are a part.

From here, we’ll travel to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and then on to Singapore to complete our 14-day trade mission. With more than 30 meetings, events, and activities scheduled, our goal is to help expand markets for U.S. dairy in collaboration with USDEC, with an emphasis on artisan cheese and dairy ingredients.


RELATED STORIES:

Exploring New Markets for Dairy Exports

Oregon dairy trade mission 2017

As you read this sentence, a delegation of 14 dairy industry and trade representatives from Oregon, Washington, Utah and Arizona are exploring new business opportunities in Southeast Asia. The Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council organized this dairy trade mission to include Vietnam, Malaysia and Singapore.

The purpose of this mission is to explore new markets and connections for exports of dairy products from Oregon and the other participating states. A full slate of meetings and visits are scheduled with government, retail, factory, trade and logistics contacts, fittingly returning during World Trade Month on May 4.

On a global scale, overall demand for dairy products continues to grow. For example, in the cheese category alone there is a projected 25% volume growth of all global cheese trade by 2021, equivalent to an additional 500,000 metric tons. Most of the projected potential lies with developing countries where growing populations, rising incomes, expansion of the middle class and greater desire for western diets is driving demand.

Dairy is Oregon’s fourth largest agricultural commodity in Oregon by value with a total economic impact of more than a billion dollars. Exports of Oregon dairy products totaled $93,662,000 in 2014. Approximately 80 percent of the dairy products made in Oregon are produced for other domestic or international markets. Previous trade missions have opened doors in South Korea and Japan.

Pete Kent, Executive Director of the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council, will be sharing insights from the trade mission on this website and through our social media accounts along the way.

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