Tag Archives: cottage cheese

Caprese-Style Cottage Cheese Topper

Serve on toasted slices of Italian or French bread. A light, refreshing appetizer for your summertime parties.

Serves 6

dash-recipehealthy-recipeSide dish recipeentree-recipe

 

 

Dietitian’s Tip: A great way to get a boost of dairy protein with 11 grams of protein per serving.

 

INGREDIENTS

2 cups 2% fat cottage cheese
1 cup coarsely chopped fresh tomatoes
¼ cup chopped fresh basil
¼ cup toasted slivered almonds
5-6 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
½ teaspoon ground black pepper

 

INSTRUCTIONS

Coarsely chop the tomato.

Chop the fresh basil.

Mince the garlic cloves.

Toast the slivered almonds until lightly brown in a skillet over medium heat. Watch them carefully.

Combine all ingredients and blend well.

Serve on toasted bread of your choice.

 

NUTRITIONAL FACTS

Per serving: 115 calories, 6 g total fat, 1 g saturated fat, 6 g carbohydrate, 11 g protein, 2 g fiber, 317 mg sodium, 201 mg potassium, 29 mg magnesium, 108 mg calcium

 

Photo and adapted recipe courtesy of Darigold

Improving Nutrition, Healthcare Outcomes in Older Adults

Nationwide, up to 60 percent of hospitalized older adults may be malnourished, with an estimated price tag of $51.3 billion. It is no surprise that a 300 percent increase in health care costs can be attributed to poor nutrition status.  In Oregon, Registered Dietitian Nutritionists are in the forefront of the fight to prevent and treat malnutrition.

Partnering with nutrition leaders, Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council is working to raise awareness and has gathered educational tools to help health professionals recognize and treat malnutrition. The resources also help older adults realize that they need to ask about nutrition and advocate for improved care.ask-about-your-nutrition

Oregon Governor Kate Brown joined the Oregon Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in shining the light on the impact of malnutrition – especially in older adults – by proclaiming September 26 to 30 as Malnutrition Awareness Week in Oregon.

Preventing and treating malnutrition can be as simple as following the MyPlate guidelines.  Eating enough food and the right amounts from each food group is the key. Protein is especially important.

Everyone, and especially those at risk of malnutrition such as the ill or elderly, should aim to consume 3-4 ounces of protein at each meal (30 grams). Protein-rich dairy foods are a convenient, affordable and tasty option for seniors.  Try milk (lactose-free, if needed), cheese, Greek yogurt, yogurt and cottage cheese.  Find out what a serving is and how you can get enough with these fact sheets:

Protein Pointers

Eating to Optimize Surgery or Treatment

Eating to Meet Your Body’s Needs

Eating for Your Best Health

Malnutrition awareness is important. Learn more about this issue at this link to a KPTV television story with Providence nutrition services.

Throwing for Tokyo, Driven By Dairy

With the close of the Rio Olympics, the summer games will be out of sight and out of mind for most until the Olympic flame reignites in Japan in 2020. There are some though, whose competitive spirit still burns bright. Melissa Ausman, a national-caliber discus thrower and senior at Concordia University in Oregon, is one such athlete with her sights set on the Tokyo Olympics.melissa-ausman-headshot

It’s a long way to Tokyo from the dairy farm in Nyssa, Oregon, where Melissa grew up – 5,135 miles to be exact. And that dairy farm is where it all began, starting with her relentless work ethic and mental fortitude. Just ask her father, Frank.

“Melissa and all the kids basically started out just like I did as a kid out here; you start with taking care of the baby calves, haying and graining, and you work your way up the ladder,” he said. “Out here, you figure out real quick that it doesn’t matter what day it is or how cold or hot it is or whatever, the work has to be done.”dairy farm in nyssa oregon

Melissa agreed, “There are no days off when you’re on the dairy, or trying to reach your goals.”

Ausman began throwing for sport in seventh grade, when she discovered her drive to become an Olympic athlete. Her throwing career was instigated by her competitive side, urging her to throw better than her older brother. She continued to improve over the years that followed, winning state in high school, setting records at Oregon State University, and now training for that next big step at Concordia University.

Currently, she can throw a discus 53.91 meters (176.87 feet), which is beyond the width of an NFL football field. This distance has Ausman just 40 feet away from qualifying for the Olympics. Within two years, she will achieve this mark if she continues to add distance at her current pace.

Ausman has immersed herself completely into her training. Even on her weekly rest day where she stays home from the gym, she continually trains her mind by learning how to improve. That means keeping current on Olympic medalists and working aspects of their training into her routines. She has also learned the importance of balance. melissa-ausman-training

“I’m a sister, daughter, student, athlete — and each one represents a spoke on a wheel,” said Ausman. “If I spend too much on one spoke, then I have a lumpy, lopsided wheel.” After coming to this realization during her sophomore year, Ausman found her balance and beat her personal discus record by 19 feet.

Ausman also depends on the nutritional benefits of dairy in her training regimen. She shamelessly sports an overstuffed bag full of whey protein powder containers to ensure access to nutrition after workouts. Before bed, Melissa’s favorite snack is cottage cheese with pears and cinnamon. She also enjoys greek yogurt as a replacement for mayonnaise; one of many gems she has gleaned from her avid Pinterest searching. To Ausman, training in the kitchen and fueling her body properly is another vital spoke in her wheel of life.

What advice does Melissa offer to aspiring athletes? “Whatever effort you are willing to put into your sport, the results will come accordingly,” she said. “No one else is going to give you the drive to be the best.” She also warned against dwelling on setbacks, suggesting that you can’t get stuck in the past if you want to be focused on your future.
Speaking of the future, what do mom and dad think of Melissa’s Olympic aspirations?

“Oh, she’ll get there, I’m sure,” said Frank. “Anytime I have ever doubted her, she has proven me wrong.”

“She gets her mind set on what she wants to do, and that’s what she’s going to do,” said Lyndia. “I’m not going to put off getting a passport.”