Tag Archives: dairy in oregon

New Girl Scouts Dairy Patch Unveiled at Oregon Dairy Day Event

What do you get when you combine a fun and informative creamery tour with dairy farmers and princesses, and top it off with delicious cheese samples and ice cream? At the special Oregon Dairy Day event at Tillamook Creamery on October 20, you got 200 very excited Girl Scouts and family members. They were there to be among the first-ever to earn the new “Oregon Dairy” patch.

Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington, in partnership with the Tillamook County Creamery Association and Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council, designed this new patch program to educate girls about STEM concepts, farms and food production, and the Oregon dairy industry.

The patch program encourages Girl Scouts to learn through five hands-on steps: visit a dairy farm, discover how milk is transformed into dairy products, explore dairy nutrition, and learn about careers in the industry, from dairy farmer to food scientist to food marketer. The program concludes with a taste test.

Volunteers from the Tillamook staff, along with the Oregon Dairy Princess Ambassadors, hosted interactive stations at the Tillamook Creamery Farm Experience Center to help the Girl Scouts earn their patch.

The first station featured a visit with local dairy farmers, Taryn Martin and Logan Lancaster. They were available to answer any questions the Girl Scouts had regarding milking, cow care and farm practices. “I really enjoyed the event,” said Taryn Martin. “When I was finished for the day, I had met parents and Girl Scouts from all over Oregon and Washington and was impressed at how far some of them had traveled for the experience and education. It was so much fun to answer questions from both the parents and the scouts!”

Girl Scouts also visited a station focused on nutrition and balanced diets. Oregon Dairy Princess Ambassador First Alternate Megan Sprute explained how and why milk is a good source of calcium, nutrients, and vitamins.

To learn about different careers in the industry, the Girl Scouts conducted food science experiments, creating their very own yogurt flavor, complete with a variety of toppings (including edible glitter sprinkles)! They were also able to visit with a veterinarian to learn about cow care and a scientist to learn how to use a microscope to look for bacteria. The dairy scientist explained that all bad bacteria is kept out of milk.

The Girl Scouts finished their patch requirements by taking a tour of the Tillamook Creamery, where they watched the milk turn into cheese and the employees prepare packages for shipment. And of course, they were able to taste test samples of delicious Tillamook cheese and ice cream.

“The Oregon Dairy Patch program is a great opportunity for girls to discover the local food chain. It encourages them to be curious about where their food comes from, and what it takes to get it from the farm to the factory to their table,” said Lisa Gilham-Luginbill, Program Manager for Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington. “We hope they’ll learn something new along the way, and perhaps discover an interest or future career in the process.”

RELATED LINKS:
Girl Scouts Oregon Dairy Patch curriculum
Tillamook Creamery
Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington
Kids Corner
Careers Page

What is the Scoop?

July is National Ice Cream Month and dairy farmers, in partnership with the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council (ODNC), celebrated by delivering “random acts of ice cream” to deserving members of the community during the first-ever “Scoop it Forward Week” July 15-22.

“Ice cream is one of those things that just makes everything better, and we saw this as a simple way to bring positivity and joy to people’s lives in surprising and unexpected ways,” said Josh Thomas, Senior Director of Communications for the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council. “Random acts of kindness can be contagious, and our call to action is simply for people to spread the good and pay it forward.”

ODNC delivered locally processed ice cream treats to many places including, the Tigard Police Department, the Salem Fire Department, a playground and a skate park.

Cloud Cap Farms, a dairy in Clackamas County, also celebrated by treating the first 100 customers at Baskin-Robbins in Sandy Oregon, to a free cone. “When you buy dairy products, you are supporting my family and our business. Scoop it Forward is our way of saying thank you.”

Louie Kazemier, owner of Rickreall Dairy near Salem, also joined in the fun by delivering 250 ice cream sandwiches to Camp Attitude near Sweet Home, Oregon. Camp Attitude serves children who have special needs and their families. “It was a fun evening,” said Kazemier.

And Central Oregon’s Eberhard’s Dairy Products “scooped it forward” by handing out 36 gallons of free ice cream in Bend and Redmond. “We wanted to participate because we loved the message behind Scoop it Forward. We always say without our community we would not be where we are today so it felt good to give back to the community that has given us so much!” said Emily Eberhard.

ODNC hopes other people will continue to pass it on. “This is one small way that can make a really big difference,” said Thomas.

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Exploring New Markets for Dairy Exports

Oregon dairy trade mission 2017

As you read this sentence, a delegation of 14 dairy industry and trade representatives from Oregon, Washington, Utah and Arizona are exploring new business opportunities in Southeast Asia. The Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council organized this dairy trade mission to include Vietnam, Malaysia and Singapore.

The purpose of this mission is to explore new markets and connections for exports of dairy products from Oregon and the other participating states. A full slate of meetings and visits are scheduled with government, retail, factory, trade and logistics contacts, fittingly returning during World Trade Month on May 4.

On a global scale, overall demand for dairy products continues to grow. For example, in the cheese category alone there is a projected 25% volume growth of all global cheese trade by 2021, equivalent to an additional 500,000 metric tons. Most of the projected potential lies with developing countries where growing populations, rising incomes, expansion of the middle class and greater desire for western diets is driving demand.

Dairy is Oregon’s fourth largest agricultural commodity in Oregon by value with a total economic impact of more than a billion dollars. Exports of Oregon dairy products totaled $93,662,000 in 2014. Approximately 80 percent of the dairy products made in Oregon are produced for other domestic or international markets. Previous trade missions have opened doors in South Korea and Japan.

Pete Kent, Executive Director of the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council, will be sharing insights from the trade mission on this website and through our social media accounts along the way.

RELATED STORIES:

Inbound Trade Delegation Focuses on Dairy

This week, a delegation of 7 executives will be visiting Utah, Idaho, and Oregon on an inbound trade mission to explore opportunities for dairy exports from our region. The delegation will include buyers from six companies—three from Vietnam, two from Singapore, and one from Malaysia – most of which were visited last April by a group of Northwest processors on a trade mission from the Pacific Northwest.singapore

The delegation arrived Sunday September 25, starting in Utah, followed by Idaho visits and then ending in Oregon. They will meet with dairy processors, farmers and export and logistics professionals in all three states to learn more about product availability, quality, safety, milk sources, manufacturing processes and capabilities. This cooperative regional approach is supported by the dairy checkoff organizations in each of the three states.

“This visit represents a continuation of our ongoing efforts to develop dairy export opportunities over three previous trade missions,” said Pete Kent, Executive Director for the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council. “U.S dairy products are not well known in Southeast Asia, but we’re hoping to change that dynamic to earn a place at the table in one of the fastest growing emerging markets.”

Kent sees great potential in the near future for small and medium sized local businesses making artisan cheese and dairy ingredients. Another trade mission is already in the works that will bring these kinds of Oregon and Pacific Northwest dairy products to Vietnam in April 2017.