Tag Archives: milk

Dairy cows: The Olympians of Oregon Milk

Dairy cows as Olympians? You’ve probably never thought of dairy cows as athletes, but there are many similarities.

Dairy cows eat like champions every day. Their bodies work hard to provide nutritious, high-quality milk. Like Olympians who train hard every day, cows they need to fuel themselves with healthy food choices.

Their personal chefs (aka Oregon dairy farmers) provide nutritious and delicious meals for them by working with animal nutritionists to create balanced meals that contain the right amount of protein, energy, fiber, vitamins and minerals for the cow to maintain optimum health.

A balanced meal for cows contains:

  • Corn Silage: the entire corn plant that is chopped and fermented
  • Haylage: grass that is chopped and fermented
  • Hay: a dried grass or legume, often cut and baled
  • Cotton Seed: a by-product of cotton production that is left after the soft cotton is harvested for clothing
  • Distillers Grain: a by-product that is a dried mash produced after the sugar and starch are used in ethanol and fermented beverage production
  • Soybean Meal: a by-product of soybean oil production, sometimes pelleted for animal feed use

Some of these foods would have been sent to the landfill if cows didn’t eat them.

In fact, 75% of a dairy cow’s diet contains items humans can’t eat.

Cows bodies expend a lot of calories creating milk, so they don’t need to go out for a run or long walk like we do. Cows do need rest though, so they lie down about 12-14 hours a day!

Farmers use a version of Fitbit to track how active cows are to ensure they stay healthy and fit. It usually goes on the cow’s ear (as in the photo above) or around their neck or ankle. Dairy farmers can also use a type of technology to measure the cows’ food intake. If the cow isn’t eating the proper nutrients, the farmer is flagged to take the cow’s temperature and do an overall checkup.

Just like elite athletes, cows only receive treatment for specific illnesses.

Specifically, antibiotics are only used if a cow has a diagnosed infection and other treatments have not worked. The milk produced while the cow is receiving antibiotics is discarded. And just like athletes, a cow’s milk is tested for presence of drugs and other substances that should not be present! The milk is prevented from going into the milk supply and cannot be bottled for consumption.

Holstein (left) and Jersey (right) cows are the most common dairy cows in Oregon and produce a lot of milk. And they do this without being treated with hormones. Oregon dairy farmers care for their animals every day of the year. They are so good at taking care of their mooing athletes that the cows naturally produce our favorite 13 essential nutrients in a powerhouse drink: MILK!

Cow’s milk is safe and nutritious no matter what fat content level you prefer to enjoy as an athlete or to serve your family.

So, the next time you go to the grocery store, visit the dairy cooler! And remember the elite athletic team across the state of Oregon that provide nutritious dairy foods for you naturally each day!

Learn more about healthy eating at MyPlate.gov

MyPlate is a guide for Americans on healthful eating that includes five major food groups, fruits, vegetables, grains, protein, and dairy. MyPlate has recently been updated to reflect the newest edition of the USDA’s Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Click for a video on the new USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans

Each person needs different amounts from each food group based on their height, weight, gender, and age. It doesn’t have to be complicated, because MyPlate has an app for that!   Easily calculate your daily dietary needs in less time than it takes you to catch up on TikTok. Find the new app by searching for “Start Simple with MyPlate” in your app store.

What to explore on MyPlate.gov

Myplate.gov helps you eat healthier by including specific nutrition guidance for all stages of life! This includes nutrition for pregnancy and lactation, infancy, toddlers, preschools, kids, teens, young adults, adults, and older adults.  

Another new aspect on the MyPlate website is a quiz to help you make sure you’re getting in all the nutrients you need to stay healthy. The quiz will ask you about your regular food intake, what your goals are, and what aspects of healthy eating you want to learn more about. Once the quiz is complete, you can find out if you should increase your intake for certain food groups. You will also be provided links to resources on topics you indicated you wanted to know more about.

Besides these updates, there is a lot more to explore on the MyPlate website. If you are looking for more recipe ideas, the website has a robust recipe section where you can search by type of cuisine, kitchen equipment, food groups and more. It even has tips for eating on a budget and printable nutrition education materials in Spanish and English.

All about the MyPlate App

Once you know what food groups may be lacking in your diet, the app also helps you create goals and holds you accountable. And, it even goes one step further to generate ideas to complete these goals. There are tips on easy ways to add the food groups based on your goals, and it will link you directly to recipes that include the food groups you need. 

If your goal is one more serving of dairy in your day, the app could suggest you “start your day with dairy.” Tips include mixing sliced bananas with yogurt, preparing a fruit smoothie, or cooking oatmeal in low-fat milk. Goals for increasing vegetable intake could be “snack on vegetables” with recipes like Caprese veggie skewers to keep mealtime fun or have veggies with a bean dip or hummus. Recipes have also been gathered for SNAP recipients, featuring an array of healthy options.

If you are motivated by a friendly competition, the app could encourage you to keep up with your goals when you join challenges or earn different badges. Get the whole family involved!  

You’ll eat healthier when you let MyPlate help you implement new and fun foods into your day. And it doesn’t cost a thing, so what are you waiting for? Check out MyPlate and start today!

Liz Davitt, MS is currently a Dietetic Intern at Oregon State University. She completed her community rotation with the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council in 2021.

Resources:

MYPLATE.GOV

USDA DIETARY GUIDELINES 2020 – 2025

STAY HOME, STAY SAFE, STAY HEALTHY

DASH DIET EATING PLAN

Score Big with School Breakfast!

National School Breakfast Week is a weeklong celebration of the School Breakfast Program, which provides millions of children a nutritious morning meal each school day. Milk is an important part of those balanced, nutritious breakfasts in schools, providing a rich source of protein, calcium, and other minerals to start the day. Former NFL player and Fuel Up to Play 60 Spokesperson Anthony Newman knows the importance of eating a healthy breakfast:

“Your school day is like a big football game; it takes energy,” said Newman, “you need to start the day with fuel for your body for your big game each morning.”

Even with most students attending classes from home this year, eating breakfast is an important part of the day and a great way to fuel learning and participation. 

Children who participate in school breakfast programs show decreased anxiety, less depression and less hyperactivity. A recent study showed that the breakfasts offered by these programs can improve a child’s overall nutrition by providing her/him with necessary vitamins and minerals and can reduce the risk of obesity. There is an especially big need for these programs in Oregon, since 1 in 4 children come from low-income, food insecure homes and are at risk of hunger.

Due to Covid-19, most schools are choosing to offer students grab and go meals at locations throughout Oregon. To find out more, check with your local school or school nutrition program, or visit the Oregon Department of Education’s School Meal Resource Page

Additional Resources:

IMPROVING SCHOOL MEALS FOR OREGON STUDENTS

WHAT WILL THE SCHOOL LUNCH OF THE FUTURE LOOK LIKE?

MEET CHEF JESSICA: SERVING UP FRESH IDEAS FOR STUDENT MEALS (VIDEO)

When the Power Goes Out

With power outages happening throughout Northwest Oregon, people may be tempted to store their dairy products outside to keep them cold and fresh. Please don’t! When perishable dairy items (like milk, yogurt and ice cream) are left outside, they can become unsafe to eat.

Please follow these tips to store and enjoy your dairy products safely:

If in doubt, throw it out. If a dairy product has been unrefrigerated for longer than 2 hours, it can become contaminated by harmful bacteria. Be safe and throw it out.

Do not store your food outside, even if it’s freezing. The USDA says that outside temperatures are inconsistent, causing chilled food to enter the “danger zone” of warmer than 40°F, allowing harmful bacteria to grow.

Keep your refrigerator and freezer doors closed. A refrigerator will keep food cold for about 4 hours if the door is kept closed. A full freezer will hold its temperature for about 48 hours (24 hours if half-full).

Eat shelf-stable pantry goods. Shelf-stable milk comes in special containers and does not need to be refrigerated before consumption. You can also use powdered milk as an alternative. Please use safe, potable water when mixing and drinking.

Once power returns, check the temperature inside your refrigerator and freezer. With the exception of some hard cheeses, when a dairy product has been left in the unit above 40°F for two hours or more, toss it. Also, keep in mind that it will take several hours for your refrigerator or freezer to create a safe temperature for storing food. To keep the cooling process active, fill it with cool, not warm or hot, food.

Here are more resources on keeping your dairy foods safe:

Oregon Department of Agriculture / Temperature Requirements for Foods

FoodSafety.gov / Winter Weather Food Safety

USDA / Refrigeration and Food Safety

Oregon State University Extension Service / Food Safety Resources

Healthy Animals, Healthy Milk: The Cows Come First

The following story was written by ODNC Dietetic Intern Katlyn Wolf.

Dairy farming is a 24/7 job where cow care comes first. A dairy farmer’s top priority is the well-being of their animals, and they know that healthy cows produce healthy milk. Just like you and me, dairy cows perform best when they’re comfortable, able to socialize, and adequately nourished. Taking a virtual tour of Rickreall Dairy with farmer Louie, I learned how cow care, cow comfort and cow nutrition translate into nutritious milk.

Creature Comforts

Cow barns are designed with comfort in mind.  Cows spend an average of 12-14 hours per day lying down, whether they are on pasture or in a barn.  Bedding in the barn must offer good support and be appropriate for the temperature. As herd animals, cows prefer to live with other cows. Believe it or not, socialization helps cows develop stronger muscles and contributes to improved immunity. This can increase milk production and quality. 

Temperature control is important for cow comfort and health. Unlike humans, cows do not have many active sweat glands. Cows reduce body temperature through their breath, which is a lot of work! Farmers keep their cows cool with fans and sprinkler or mister systems. When it’s cold, barns can be temporarily closed to hold heat, bedding is changed frequently to remain clean and dry, and cow jackets may be used – functional and fashionable!

Mealtime in the “Calf”eteria 

Diet is important because it can affect the quantity and quality of the milk produced. Cows always have access to nutritious feed. It’s usually a combination of grasses, grains, and other ingredients that provide them with the right balance of nutrients. Farmers work with cow nutritionists to make sure their cows have a balanced diet that is appropriate for their age. Louie’s nutritionist visits the farm every two weeks to make sure the cows’ diets are just right and the cows are healthy.

The Parlor

Cows are often milked in buildings commonly known as the “milking parlor.” Typically, the parlor is very calm, quiet, and efficient, because cow comfort is just as important here.  Cows are milked for a short time each day, between 5 and 10 minutes, two or three times a day.  Employees escort the cows into milking stalls, then clean, dry and disinfect the cow’s udder before attaching a mechanical milking machine. Milking machines are more sanitary, more comfortable for the animal, and allow for more accurate output recording. They automatically detach when milk flow slows and the udder is empty. While cows are away from the barn for milking their barns are cleaned, like room service!

Milk is ‘udderly’ full of benefits!

As a Graduate student studying nutrition and diet, I know healthy dietary patterns include a variety of nutrient-dense foods and beverages. Milk, cheese and yogurt are nutrient-dense foods recommended by the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans because they provide protein, vitamins, minerals, and other health-promoting components. I enjoy dairy for its flavor and healthfulness. After virtually touring Rickreall Dairy with farmer Louie and learning about how animals are cared for to produce healthy milk, I’ve found that milk is even more tasty! 

Katlyn Wolf is currently a Master’s student in the Dietetic Nutrition Program at Oregon State University. She recently worked as a Dietetic Intern for the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council in 2021.

Additional Resources:

VIRTUAL TOURS BRING DAIRY FARMS TO THE CLASSROOM

FARMING WITH INNOVATION AND HEART EARNS NATIONAL AWARD FOR RICKREALL DAIRY

DAIRY ENLIGHTENING: EDUCATIONAL LEADERS TOUR CLOUD CAP FARMS

GET CONNECTED WITH DAIRY EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ONLINE

FUNNY QUESTIONS, SERIOUS IMPACTS ON DAIRY TOURS

Meet Our Cows

Which Flavor Do You Favor? Four Oregon Dairies Selling Milk at the Source

Imagine picking up your milk in glass bottles directly from the dairy farm as the cows are mooing in the background – or having your milk delivered right to your door. Although this may sound like a treasured memory from your grandmother’s past, four dairy farms in Oregon are bringing forward these time-honored traditions with some delicious options. 

Whole, pasteurized milk that is not homogenized is commonly called “creamline milk.” When the milk is homogenized, the healthy fats that occur naturally in milk are broken down to distribute evenly throughout the gallon. In non-homogenized milk, that healthy fat rises to the top to create a line of cream. Before homogenization was invented in 1899 milk drinkers would shake their milk to distribute the cream.

Milk’s nutrition benefits also come in many tasty flavors!  Like “Schocolate” Milk from Schoch Dairy & Creamery, Vanilla Latte Milk from Royal Riverside Farm, or Banana Milk from Lady Lane Farm. You can even get seasonal flavors like Blackberry Milk from Rising Sun Dairy. 

Although some grocery stores carry creamline and small batch flavored milk, you can also buy your favorite dairy products and more right at the farm! Check out the list below for an option near you. 

Lady Lane Farm (Garry’s Meadow Fresh)

Mulino, Oregon 

Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. during the winter

Address: 13025 Mulino Rd., Mulino

  • Whole, pasteurized milk in glass bottles
  • Whole, pasteurized “Brown Cow Delight” chocolate milk in glass bottles 
  • Whole, pasteurized cappuccino milk in glass bottles
  • Reduced Fat pasteurized milk in glass bottles     
  • Skim pasteurized milk in glass bottles
  • Unsalted, Salted, Garlic and Honey Farm Fresh Butter
  • Farm Fresh Eggs
  • Farm Fresh Beef 
  • Farm Fresh Pork
  • Artisan Cheese curds and a variety of wedges
  • Vanilla, Chocolate, Strawberry, Butter Pecan, Cookies and Cream, Banana Cream Pie, Mint    
  • Chocolate Chip (and many more) Old Fashioned Homemade Ice Cream 

Rising Sun Dairy

Turner, Oregon

Hours: Tuesday and Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Address: 12092 Parrish Gap Rd, SE, Turner

  • Whole, pasteurized A2A2 milk in glass bottles
  • Skim, pasteurized A2A2 milk in glass bottles
  • Whole, pasteurized A2A2 chocolate milk in glass bottles
  • Whole, pasteurized A2A2 strawberry milk in glass bottles
  •  30% Whip Cream

Royal Riverside Farm

Albany, Oregon

Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. by appointment

Address: 36042 Riverside Dr. SW, Albany 

  • Whole, pasteurized milk in glass bottles
  • Whole, pasteurized chocolate milk in glass bottles
  • Whole, pasteurized strawberry milk in glass bottles
  • Whole, pasteurized vanilla latte milk in glass bottles
  • Soft Serve Ice Cream
  • Fresh Eggs
  • Farm fresh pork
  • Farm fresh ground beef

Schoch’s Dairy and Creamery

Hillsboro, Oregon

Hours: Seven days a week, 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Address: 24335 NW Union Rd, Hillsboro 

  • Whole, pasteurized milk in glass bottles
  • Whole, pasteurized “Schocolate” milk in glass bottles
  • Eggs
  • Artisan Swiss cheese from Helvetia Creamery


In closing, here are some quick tips. When visiting a farm, watch for signage, and park in designated areas.  Avoid wandering into other parts of the farm without permission. Practice social distancing and bring a mask to ensure safety. Lastly, some farms take cash only, and if you aren’t going straight home from the farm, be sure to bring a cooler with some ice for safe storage. 

RELATED LINKS:

MILK DELIVERY RETURNS TO ITS ROOTS

THE MAGIC OF MILK: HOW TO KEEP YOUR MILK FRESH

NINE REASONS TO ENJOY REAL MILK IN YOUR HANDCRAFTED COFFEE DRINK

Milk delivery returns to its roots

What’s old is new again as companies like Milk Run and Alpenrose bring back milk deliveries of the past with a new twist.  Vans splashed with colorful logos and full of local milk and produce are bringing the farm directly to your doorstep so that you can experience the fresh taste of locally harvested food.

Alpenrose, a dairy that began in 1916 in Portland, recently returned to it’s milk delivery roots this August by delivering daily milk and produce within the Portland metro area. You won’t get milk in glass bottles, but it’s easy to order through their website or mobile app.

“It’s been nearly 40 years since our trucks delivered fresh milk to the area,” said Josh Reynolds, general manager for Alpenrose. “We are ready to bring back a new, modern twist on home delivery.”

Customers can order dairy products, along with an array of produce that includes coffee from Stumptown, blackberries from Hurst’s Farm and Spielman’s bagels.

Milk Run, the brainchild of farmer Julia Niiro, started with a question: How could farmers bring fresh food from their farms directly to their neighbors?  Niiro, a partner with Revel Meat Co. in Canby, OR, reached out to a handful of neighboring farms to join her in answering it.  A few short years later, Milk Run operates in Portland and Seattle and works with over 200 farmers across Oregon to supply it’s rapidly growing customer base.  

With more people stuck at home due to quarantining, Milk Run saw an opportunity to shrink the gap between farmers and consumers and educate prospective locavores. “I think that the tactile experience of getting the food in our Milk Run box is the teaching tool for understanding what can be experienced locally.” said Lilly Harris, Operations Manager for Milk Run.  

Alongside favorite staples like Sourdough Boules from Grano Bakery, fresh eggs from Trent Family Farms and Gravenstein Apples from Kiyokawa Orchards, dairy lovers will be happy to see locally produced milk, cheese, butter, yogurt, cream cheese, sour cream and more.  Participating farms and processors include TMK Creamery, Garry’s Meadow Fresh, Nancy’s, Organic Valley, Larsen’s Creamery, Lulubelle’s Creamery, Briar Rose Creamery, Cascadia Creamery and Willamette Valley Cheese.” 

“We can think about local food abstractly,” said Harris, “But having it delivered to your doorstep and opening a box of local produce is a totally different experience. You’re able to see what’s in season and learn why it’s important to cherish the produce when it’s fresh and ripe.”

Farmers seem to be responding in kind to the local demand for their products. Lulubelle’s, one of Milk Run’s dairy purveyors, will soon be producing new products like Half & Half and Heavy Cream for it’s online customers.

In working directly with farmers, Harris commented, “I think farmers are the most grounded, intelligent people that we could possibly work with.  They’re knowledgable about their craft and excited to share what they produce with consumers.  I love being able to provide that conduit for their excitement and knowledge.” 

Domino’s and Dairy: A Partnership Powered by Pizza

What does a popular pizza chain and a local dairy have in common? A lot more than just cheese. Both are part of a strong partnership that benefits farmers, local franchisees and their communities.

Recently, Jake Fraizer of Dallas, Oregon, was awarded a Certificate of Appreciation from the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council for his exemplary contributions to the dairy industry and his local community.

Jake Fraizer has only had one job in his life. “I started delivering pizzas when I was 18, and worked my way up,” he said. Now 17 years later, he’s part owner in a successful Domino’s pizza store in Dallas, Oregon. “I love it,” he said. “I still love delivering. No one is ever mad to see the pizza guy.”

In 2019, Domino’s was named the top pizza chain based on annual sales, but that has not always been the case. In a 2009, in a survey of consumer taste preferences among national pizza chains, Domino’s tied for last place. That same year Domino’s announced plans to entirely reinvent its pizza with a unique ad campaign where consumers were filmed criticizing the pizza quality, and chefs were shown developing a new pizza. The dairy checkoff organization, Dairy Management Inc. (DMI) committed to address this situation with Domino’s because about 25 percent of all U.S. cheese ends up on a pizza.

“During the past ten years, we have invested in partnerships with influential quick service restaurant companies,” said Marilyn Hershey, board member for DMI. “That investment includes providing these partners with consumer insights, product development and nutrition expertise to develop new menu choices that include dairy, and that in turn find new markets for farmer’s milk. “Our four key partners, Domino’s, McDonald’s, Taco Bell and Pizza Hut have moved more than 2 billion equivalent pounds of milk in the duration of our work together.”

“Domino’s is one of these partnerships that feels more like family than partner,” said Hershey. “They love our partnership, they love dairy farmers, and they love our cheese.”

“It’s nice for me to let customers know that the cheese is actually from a farm,” said Fraizer. “Everybody thinks all fast food is fake, and it’s not. So that’s a big part of it, especially when it comes to dairy. I’d rather have all of our ingredients locally, like in the US, instead of getting shipped around, so I like the dairy partnerships.”

But this small town Domino’s and a local dairy have more in common than just cheese.

“When we are harvesting the crops, my guys put in long hours. Sometimes it’s nice to be able to offer them a warm meal as a thank you,” said Louie Kazemier, Owner of Rickreall Dairy, located just outside of Dallas, Oregon.

Even though the farm is technically out of Fraizer’s service radius, he will still deliver to Rickreall Dairy.  “We deliver out to the dairy a lot,” said Fraizer. “Louie does so much for the community I don’t mind.”

And, Fraizer often goes above and beyond. One year, after a particularly difficult harvest, Fraizer didn’t charge anything for the pizzas. “I’m still not sure if he could see the exhaustion on my face or was just feeling generous, but either way it was really nice,” said Kazemier.

The appreciation is mutual. “He does so much for Christmas Cheer, and the community. And Christmas Cheer means a lot to me,” said Fraizer.

Christmas Cheer, a nonprofit organization in Dallas, feeds families in need over the holidays. Fraizer and his wife joined the board of directors four years ago. “I think every kid should see how lucky they are that they have food,” said Fraizer. “That was ingrained in me, especially by my dad.”  

Christmas Cheer does various canned food drives throughout the year, but the perishable items like meat and dairy products, are more difficult to obtain. Kazemier’s donation of ground beef and milk helped to feed 500 families this past Christmas. “Anything perishable like meat or milk or cheese is so expensive that getting a donation is massive,” says Fraizer.

Fraizer’s donation of time and effort is an easy decision. “I grew up in this town, I think it’s kind of selfish if I don’t [give back],” he said. “I also like that it’s local. I know exactly where the money is going”.

Kazemier shares Fraizer’s sentiments on giving back. “I’ve been blessed and I want to bless others,” he said.

Their lives barely ever intersect, except when pizza is delivered, but this dairy farm owner and franchisee partner together to not only make a high quality product for their customers, but also in giving back to their community.

RELATED LINKS:

Domino’s Bets Added Cheese Will Further Grow Brand

Domino’s- An Undeniably Strong Partnership

Nine Reasons to Enjoy Real Milk in Your Handcrafted Coffee Drink

These days, there are a lot of choices when it comes to ordering barista-crafted beverages, and it isn’t just about flavored syrups. Most of that latte, mocha or cappuccino you enjoy is comprised of milk (or alternatives), and at $4 to $6 a cup it’s an investment that you want to get right.

As individuals, we certainly have our own choices, and there are plenty of reasons to proudly order real milk in your favorite coffee beverage. Here are nine of them:

1. Enjoy a Perfect Pairing

Many baristas prefer to use real milk for specialty coffee drinks. It has the right taste, creamy texture, and foams consistently when steamed because of its richness in protein.

2. Get Real

Milk has one of the cleanest labels around. What you see is what you get, so you know exactly what you’re drinking when you order real milk.

3. Consider the Footprint

About 90% of greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. are from transportation, power generation, industry, commercial and residential. Yet U.S. dairy’s impact is estimated at just two percent, and dairy farmers just keep improving their practices.

4. Buy Local

On average, real milk travels less than 100 miles from cow to coffee shop.

5. Choose Sustainability

Dairy farmers are sustainable by nature. Their cows can eat food that humans can’t or don’t want to eat and upcycle it into milk. Farmers recycle water, use manure as natural fertilizer, regenerate their lands and some even generate renewable natural gas and electricity.

6. Boost Your Economy

The dairy industry provides jobs and pays for services that support families in our rural communities. Dairy processing jobs also pay higher on average than others in the food processing sector, and those wages are spent locally.

7. Drink Nutrients

Nutrient-dense milk is often called nature’s perfect beverage. It is packed with nine essential nutrients and is an especially good source of protein and calcium.

8. Support Cow Care

Dairy cows are well cared for. Farmers know that when they treat their cows well, the cows perform better. In addition to a nutritious diet and healthcare, many enjoy back scratchers, waterbeds, and climate-controlled shelters.

9. Save Money

Real milk is affordable and a great value.

Dairy farmers work 365 days a year (366 days in 2020) to bring milk and dairy products to your local coffee shops, grocery stores and kitchen tables. They take great pride in caring for their employees, animals and natural resources. So the next time you order a triple “mochalatteccino” or whatever your go-to order is, make sure you ask for real milk, and raise a toast to your local dairy farmers!

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