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Grant Helps Hermiston School Connect Technology, Nutrition

Armand-Larive-Middle-School_students

Fuel Up to Play 60 grant funding provided by local dairy farmers is making a difference in Oregon schools.

Armand Larive Middle School in Hermiston received a grant of $3,555 to purchase a computer, accessories and software for video production. The new computer equipment enables students to make Food Hero time lapse recipe videos to help educate students on healthy recipes.

For the application, the school teamed with Angie Treadwell, Family and Community Health Umatilla-Morrow SNAP-Ed Program Coordinator for Oregon State University Extension Center. “We are excited for the opportunity to help Armand Larive students gain additional experience in video production while educating and promoting healthy behaviors among their peers and perhaps, the community at large,” said Treadwell.

Additionally, with the new computer equipment purchased, students were able to compete at the Student Television Network Conference in Anaheim, California in March. Under the category of Middle School Anchor Team, Armand Larive took 2nd honorable mention.

At a special school assembly in April, the Food Hero videos were shown to the student body while they enjoyed tasting the ever-popular“Popeye Power Smoothie.” All of the videos created by the students are now on www.FoodHero.org.

Fuel Up to Play 60 is an in-school nutrition and physical activity program launched by the National Dairy Council and NFL, in collaboration with the USDA, to help encourage today’s youth to lead healthier lives. To learn more about the grant visit www.fueluptoplay60.com.

Farming with Innovation and Heart Earns National Award for Rickreall Dairy

rickreall dairy_louies-portrait

A dedication to protecting the environment, maintaining good employee relations and preserving herd health has earned Louie Kazemier of Rickreall Dairy an Outstanding Dairy Farm Sustainability Award from the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy.

The award, now in its sixth year, is awarded for a dairy’s use of sustainable practices in areas of cow care, energy conservation, water conservation, nutrient management, and business and employee relations.

Rickreall is the first dairy from Oregon to win the award. It was one of only three such awards in the country this year, and the only one west of the Mississippi River.

Kazemier, who has managed Rickreall Dairy since 1991, summed up his commitment to sustainability as a constant effort “to do the right thing.”

“I believe that if we know a better way to do stuff and don’t do it, I don’t think we are honoring our purpose here in life,” he said.

His work on the dairy, more than defining him, he said is an extension of his philosophy on life.

Among reasons cited by the U.S. Dairy Innovation Center for Kazemier’s award are his philanthropic efforts to help others.

Kazemier travels regularly to Uganda to instruct dairy farmers, build housing and mentor young men. In Oregon, Kazemier built Camp Attitude, a camp for families with special-needs children.

In Rickreall, residents know him for his open-door policy, and the steps he takes to be a good neighbor.

“We are ultra-sensitive to the public,” Kazemier said. “We only irrigate certain fields, certain times of the day, because of wind direction and concerns with odor. And we have an open door policy, where anybody who wants to see the dairy can come in. We bring in a minimum of 2,000 school children a year at no cost to the schools.”

Rickreall-Dairy-signWhen it comes to the environmental improvements, Kazemier worked with Energy Trust of Oregon and the U.S. Department of Agriculture to upgrade his barn lighting and parlor laundry systems, steps that have reduced his energy use by hundreds of thousands of kilowatts per year.

Kazemier’s nutrient management plan involves applying only the amount of nutrients plants take up, so nutrients don’t leave the soil profile. He conducts water-quality tests in a nearby creek on a quarterly basis, and takes soils tests on the farm’s cropland on an annual basis, just to be sure.

Additionally, Kazemier provides neighboring farmer Scott Zeigler excess manure nutrients from Rickreall Dairy in exchange for feed, an arrangement that has proved beneficial to both parties.

Kazemier’s father-in-law, Gus Wybenga, a third-generation dairy farmer who expanded and redesigned Rickreall Dairy when he purchased it in 1990, designed it with water conservation in mind. Kazemier has refined the system to capture and conserve water, and ensure that tap water is recycled at least three times before being used for irrigation.

And Kazemier has arranged with a local food processor to take excess waste water off the processor’s hands, an arrangement that, again, benefits both parties.

When it comes to his 3,500 cows, Kazemier works closely with a nutritionist, a veterinarian and a herd manager to regulate and monitor herd health. And he uses computer software to track daily milk production and maintain health and treatment records.

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Rickreall Dairy meets most of its feed needs through double-cropping ryegrass silage and corn silage and on the dairy’s 1,100 acres of cropland. Kazemier supplements that with high-quality alfalfa hay, along with two byproducts from a local biofuel production plant, plus mineral supplements, beet pulp, cottonseed, hominy and corn grain, and the feed he gets from Zeigler Farms.

Kazemier uses composted manure solids for cow bedding, a practice that, in addition to providing a comfortable and sanitary bedding, also provides another beneficial use for dairy waste, and he has removed exterior walls to improve air circulation in the dairy’s five free-stall barns.

According to John Rosecrans, the dairy’s nutritionist, Rickreall Dairy cows consistently rank as an “A” herd, exhibiting high milk-production-to-feed rates, low cull rates and high pregnancy rates – all key elements in a dairy’s success.
“This is one of those dairies where you can walk through the cow pens and they don’t run from you, they follow you,” Rosecrans said. “That tells you a lot about a farm.”

Then there are the dairy’s twenty-five year-round employees, workers with an average a tenure of twenty years.

“People don’t quit very quickly here,” Kazemier said, “and I take a lot of pride in that, because agriculture is a tough business, and my guys, they know that I’ve got their back if they put one-hundred percent into this job.”

Indeed, cows, people, the community and the environment all seem to benefit from their association with Louie Kazemier and Rickreall Dairy.

 


 


RELATED LINKS

Oregon Dairy Farm Receives National Sustainability Award
NEWS RELEASE | June 29, 2017
Rickreall Dairy Lauded for Farming with Innovation and Heart

Dairy Farms and Businesses are Advancing Sustainable Practices, from Farm to Table
NEWS RELEASE | June 29, 2017
Winners announced for sixth annual U.S. Dairy Sustainability Awards, progress report released

Louie Kazemier: Dairy Farmer, Humanitarian, Heart of Gold

Starting the Day out Right with School Breakfast

Imlay students are Fueled Up

Students at Imlay Elementary in Hillsboro, Oregon are starting the day out right with school breakfast thanks to the support of Fuel Up to Play 60 and the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council.

Knowing the importance of breakfast for student success motivated the Fuel Up to Play 60 team at Imlay Elementary to apply for grant funding through the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council. Funds brought new life to the cafeteria space with a fresh coat of paint, new menu boards, sound system and posters.

Imlay held a special Fuel Up to Play 60 kick off assembly to highlight all their cafeteria improvements. Teachers encouraged hungry students to participate in “Grab and Go” breakfast and used breakfast time as an opportunity to teach students about “What is a Healthy Breakfast.”

Classes have been fueling their minds and bodies with a friendly competition for the highest breakfast participation. “The student wellness team is helping serve food and participating in taste testing, gathering breakfast participation data and making wellness announcements,” said first grade teacher Lisa Sagapolu.

Fuel Up to Play 60 is the largest school nutrition and physical activity program in the country. The program is administered locally by the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council, in partnership with the National Football League, U.S. Department of Agriculture and the National Dairy Council.

Grants Support Strengthening Oregon Schools and Students

Schools across Oregon have innovative projects underway focused on youth engagement, nutrition and physical activity, thanks to Fuel Up to Play 60 grants funded by Oregon dairy farmers. Fuel Up to Play 60 is the largest in-school health and wellness program in the country.

The Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council, in partnership with the National Football League, U.S. Department of Agriculture and the National Dairy Council, awarded grants to eight schools throughout the state last fall.

With grant funding, schools are purchasing blenders for yogurt smoothie classroom celebrations and carts for grab-and-go breakfast options. Brand new pans and salad bar inserts will be featuring fruits and vegetables from school gardens in cafeterias. Noise cancelling blankets are going up in one cafeteria to reduce noise and bring Smarter Lunch Room concepts to students. One school is using funding to create time lapse videos featuring Food Hero recipes highlighting whole grains, fruit and low fat dairy.

Physical activity goes hand in hand with nutrition for Oregon students. Students will be energized and ready to focus on learning throughout the day by participating in brain breaks in class. Students will be stretching out in yoga poses, checking their heart rates with monitors and counting steps with pedometers.

For more information on how you and your school can get in on the action contact the schools team:

Crista Hawkins, RDN, LD
Director of School Programs
chawkins@odncouncil.org
Direct: 971-673-2725

Erin Hirte, RDN, LD
Manager of School Programs
ehirte@odncouncil.org
Direct: 971-673-2729

Federal Dietary Guidelines Recommend Dairy

dary foods

Early this year, the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGAs) were released jointly by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the United States Department of Health and Human Services. Similar to previous versions, the new DGAs recommend three servings of dairy each day as an important part of a healthy eating pattern.

The full report brings attention to the fact that daily dairy intake for most Americans falls below recommendations and calls for increased consumption. Adding one serving of dairy every day can help Americans get the nutrients they need in an easy and affordable way.

Dairy foods are nutrient rich and among the top sources of calcium, vitamin D and potassium, which are nutrients of concern in the American diet. Few other foods deliver dairy’s powerhouse of nutrients in such an affordable, appealing and readily available way. By comparison, it would take 21 cups of chopped broccoli to deliver the same amount of calcium as three glasses of milk.

The DGAs are significant because they form the foundation of all the USDA nutrition programs – school meals, WIC, Head Start, extension and SNAP-Ed. They also impact the nutrition recommendations health professionals give their patients and curriculum in the classroom.

RELATED ARTICLE: Decoding the Dairy Case

Student Lily Sweet Representing Oregon at National Summit

Early on Sunday morning, sixth-grader Lily Sweet leaves Portland for Purdue University in Indiana, where she will represent Oregon at the national Fuel Up to Play 60 Student Ambassador Summit. As Oregon’s 2016-2017 Fuel Up to Play 60 State Ambassador, she will attend with students from other states, program advisors and professional athletes from the National Football League.

Inspired and led by youth, Fuel Up to Play 60 is an in-school nutrition and physical activity program created by the National Dairy Council and the NFL, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, to help encourage today’s youth to lead healthier lives. The summit provides leadership, communication and program training to select students who drive the Fuel Up to Play 60 program in their respective schools, communities and states.

Lily just completed fifth grade at Elk Meadow Elementary School in Bend, and will go to High Desert Middle School in September. At her school, she has promoted events and activities that encourage her fellow students to eat healthy food and exercise more – like setting up a smoothie booth at school conferences and creating an informational video. “One of my favorite projects that the team and I did was writing and performing our own play to promote wellness,” said Sweet.

This is the second year in a row that an Elk Meadow Elementary School student has been selected to represent Oregon at the national level, which is a rare feat. There were only 67 such ambassadors selected from across the country last year. Elk Meadow has reached Fuel Up to Play 60 “Touchdown Status” for two consecutive years with a strong staff and student commitment to wellness, and the school was selected as one of three Oregon Department of Education School Wellness Award recipients in 2015.

“For two state ambassadors to be selected from the same school back-to-back is quite an accomplishment for the school, the students and their advisor, Grant Mattox” said Crista Hawkins, Director of School Programs for the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council.

Fuel Up to Play 60 is active in more than 73,000 schools nationwide and more than half of the public schools in Oregon. The Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council manages Fuel Up to Play 60 grants, supporting school-wide activities in both physical education and better access to nutrition, including school breakfasts. In the latest round, districts and schools will receive nearly $20,000 with a combined reach of more than 340,000 students throughout Oregon.

For more information about Fuel up to Play 60, visit www.fueluptoplay60.com.

Summit Connects Agriculture, Healthy Eating and Learning

It’s a bird, it’s a plane! No, it’s a teacher flying through the air on a zip line.

The Northwest Regional Fuel Up to Play 60 Summit went to new heights on Monday, June 27, at Tree to Tree Aerial Adventure Park. On the first day of a two day summit, a unique mix of educational and agricultural leaders learned firsthand about the learning connection between physical activity and brain function while testing their own physical abilities.

Fuel Up to Play 60 is an in-school nutrition and physical activity program created by the National Dairy Council and the NFL, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Inspired and led by youth, it empowers students to eat healthy, be active and make positive changes in their schools and communities.

The Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council and Idaho Dairy Council invited leaders from schools and farms in both states who are committed to bettering the lives of students and learning ways of leveraging the proven benefits of improved learning through better diet and exercise. During the summit, they shared their Fuel Up to Play 60 experiences aimed at engaging and empowering youth to eat healthy and to be physically active at school, at home and in the community.

“This regional summit brought together school administrators, nutrition service directors, teachers, state partners and dairy farmers to increase everyone’s understanding of the connection between agriculture, healthy eating, physical activity and learning,” said Crista Hawkins, Manager of School Programs for Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council. “We have so much to learn from one another.”

Cliff Garbett reflects on the regional Summit and Fuel Up to Play 60.

Pro Quarterback Kellen Clemens Promotes Youth Wellness in Ontario

FUTP60

He’s a quarterback for the San Diego Chargers and a homegrown success story that goes back to setting records at Burns High School and playing for the University of Oregon. Kellen Clemens was welcomed back to his eastern Oregon roots for a special assembly at Ontario High School on Wednesday, April 13, to talk about the importance of nutrition, exercise and teamwork.

Clemens spoke to the entire student body at a special assembly about youth wellness and stayed for a question and answer session following the presentation. After providing an overview of his background, he addressed the importance of healthy eating and being physically active. He also talked about the value of teamwork, giving thanks and service to others.

While at the school, Clemens met with Superintendent Nicole Albisu, Principal Andy Kovach, Ontario High School students, members of the faculty and school board, representatives from the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council, and other invited guests. He talked with community and student leaders, visited a P.E. class, signed autographs and offered photo opportunities.

The appearance was made possible by the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council and the Fuel Up to Play 60 program – an in-school nutrition and physical activity program created by the National Dairy Council and the NFL, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Inspired and led by youth, it empowers students to eat healthy, be active and make positive changes in their schools and communities.