Tag Archives: yogurt

DASH into the New Year for a Healthier You

by Josie Oleson, Oregon Health & Science University Dietetic Intern

Having trouble setting a New Year’s resolution? Why not DASH into 2018 by eating better and working toward a healthier you?

Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, or DASH, emphasizes dairy, fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean protein as part of a balanced diet to reduce high blood pressure and improve health. Cheese, milk, and yogurt provide essential nutrients like calcium, potassium and magnesium that are key in making the DASH diet work.

For eight years, DASH has been ranked the Best Diet Overall diet by U.S. News and World Report. In 2018, the eating plan also topped the “healthy eating” and “heart disease prevention” categories.

The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association recently lowered the recommendations for what it means to have high blood pressure. This change will increase the number of people with elevated or high blood pressure, but this also means that people will be able to fight back sooner by changing their diet and getting more exercise. This is what the DASH diet was originally designed to do, but it’s also a healthy way of eating that is recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Want to kick-start your DASH resolution?

Take the Rate Your Plate Quiz and get started with this 4-step plan.


Try this new DASH recipe – White Chicken Chili

 

 

 

 


Find more recipes.

dash-recipe

What’s in a Waldorf Salad? Watch this Video and Find Out!

No better time than apple season to indulge in this DASH friendly Waldorf Salad

Serves 6

dash-recipehealthy-recipeSide dish recipe

 

 

Dietitian’s Tip: This recipe uses fat free yogurt in place of mayonnaise to reduce fat and boost nutrient content. The toasted walnuts, celery, raisins and dressing compliment the tartness of the apples. To put together a complete DASH friendly meal, enjoy this salad with:

  • A whole wheat grilled cheese sandwich
  • A whole wheat roll with a glass of milk
  • Whole wheat crackers with cheese

INGREDIENTS
1⁄3 cup walnuts, chopped
2 apples, cored and diced
1 cup celery, diced
1⁄2 cup raisins
1⁄4 cup fat free plain yogurt
1⁄2 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon lemon juice

 

INSTRUCTIONS
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Place chopped walnuts on a baking sheet and bake for 12-15 minutes. Stir occasionally until they are evenly toasted.

Combine apples, celery, nuts, and raisins.

Stir together yogurt, sugar, and lemon juice. Pour over apple mixture and toss lightly.

Refrigerate leftovers within 2 hours.

 

NUTRITIONAL FACTS
Per serving: 120 calories, 4.5 g total fat, 0 g saturated fat, 21 g carbohydrate, 2 g protein, 3 g fiber, 20 mg sodium, 40 mg calcium

 

RECIPE COURTESY OF: Food Hero

Community Inspired to Live Stronger, Healthier and Happier

livebest-with-yogurtWho doesn’t want to live a stronger, healthier and happier life?

All were elements of Judy Barbe’s Eating Well, Being Well workshop in Tillamook on Saturday, March 11. Barbe is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and a nationally-known author and speaker, and her appearance was sponsored by the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council.

Organized by the Tillamook County Year of Wellness Nutrition Committee, and led by Oregon State University Extension Professor Jessica Linnell, PhD, the event drew more than 70 attendees, including all ages and walks of life. In addition to Tillamook Mayor Suzanne Weber and Commissioner Bill Baertlein, dairy representatives included local dairy farmers Julie Lourenzo and Joanne Seals, as well as Dairy Extension County Leader Troy Downing.

Judy-Barbe-TipsJudy Barbe engaged the audience in exercises aimed at assessing their food and lifestyle choices along with some goal setting activities to make improvements. She made an impression. One of the attendees said, “I am going to lose the prejudices I’ve formed about several food groups.” Another later posted a picture of his notes from the presentation posted on his refrigerator at home. Still another Tweeted about her meal prepping after the workshop.

Barbe gave positive “dairy deliciousness” food suggestions and addressed the health benefits of consuming real dairy. She answered questions about dairy fat and alternative beverages. Hallie Hopkins with Oregon State University Extension Service provided a tasty and instructive food demonstration with bulgur, roasted vegetables and a yogurt sauce made with donated Tillamook yogurt.

“The workshop concluded with participants sharing the goals they set for themselves based on what they learned,” said Anne Goetze, Senior Director of Nutrition Affairs for the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council. “People left motivated to make positive changes.”

THE TILLAMOOK COUNTY YEAR OF WELLNESS NUTRITION COMMITTEE INCLUDES:
Michelle Jenck, Year of Wellness
Laura Swanson, Tillamook Pioneer
Sue Phillips-Meyer, Adventist Health
Hallie Hopkins, Oregon State University Extension
Mis Carlson-Swanson, Oregon Food Bank
Dawna Roesener, Tillamook County WIC
Lauren Sorg, Food Roots
Joyce Trogdon, Rinehart Clinic

RELATED LINKS:

Tillamook County Year of Wellness

LiveBest – website for Judy Barbe, RDN

Grants Support Strengthening Oregon Schools and Students

Schools across Oregon have innovative projects underway focused on youth engagement, nutrition and physical activity, thanks to Fuel Up to Play 60 grants funded by Oregon dairy farmers. Fuel Up to Play 60 is the largest in-school health and wellness program in the country.

The Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council, in partnership with the National Football League, U.S. Department of Agriculture and the National Dairy Council, awarded grants to eight schools throughout the state last fall.

With grant funding, schools are purchasing blenders for yogurt smoothie classroom celebrations and carts for grab-and-go breakfast options. Brand new pans and salad bar inserts will be featuring fruits and vegetables from school gardens in cafeterias. Noise cancelling blankets are going up in one cafeteria to reduce noise and bring Smarter Lunch Room concepts to students. One school is using funding to create time lapse videos featuring Food Hero recipes highlighting whole grains, fruit and low fat dairy.

Physical activity goes hand in hand with nutrition for Oregon students. Students will be energized and ready to focus on learning throughout the day by participating in brain breaks in class. Students will be stretching out in yoga poses, checking their heart rates with monitors and counting steps with pedometers.

For more information on how you and your school can get in on the action contact the schools team:

Crista Hawkins, RDN, LD
Director of School Programs
chawkins@odncouncil.org
Direct: 971-673-2725

Erin Hirte, RDN, LD
Manager of School Programs
ehirte@odncouncil.org
Direct: 971-673-2729

Tandori Chicken with Rice

Tandoori chicken is packed with flavor from various spices, but isn’t necessarily hot. The combination of spices will keep you warm on cold days.

Serves 6

dash-recipehealthy-recipeentree-recipe

 

 

Dietitian’s Tip: Tandoori chicken is spice-filled and offers a lot of flavor. Consider cutting back on the amount of crushed hot red pepper flakes if you’d like to go easy on the heat. Tame the spiciness with a dollop of cool plain lowfat or fat-free yogurt. Serve with steamed brown basmati rice and green peas.

Ingredients:
1 cup plain nonfat yogurt
½ cup lemon juice
5 garlic cloves, crushed
2 tbsp paprika
1 tsp yellow curry powder
1 tsp ground ginger
1 tsp crushed hot red pepper flakes (use ½ tsp for milder flavor)
6 skinless, boneless chicken breasts cut into 1-2 inch pieces
6 skewers soaked in water for at least 15 minutes

Preparation:
Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Combine yogurt, lemon juice, garlic, paprika, yellow curry powder, ginger and red pepper flakes in a blender and process until smooth.

Skewer an equal amount of chicken pieces onto each of the soaked skewers. Place chicken skewers in a shallow casserole dish. Add half of the yogurt mixture, reserving the remainder. Cover and chill for about 15 minutes.

Spray another shallow baking dish with cooking spray. Remove chicken skewers, discard the yogurt marinade, and place chicken skewers in prepared dish. Brush chicken with reserved yogurt mixture.

Bake for 15-20 minutes or until juices run clear when meat is pierced. Serve immediately. For a slightly more authentic preparation grill the chicken skewers over medium-high heat for 3-5 minutes per side.

Nutrition Information:
Per serving: 165 calories, 2 g total fat, 0.5 g saturated fat, 8 g carbohydrates, 30 g protein, 101 mg sodium, 1 g fiber.

Yogurt and Dill Smashed Potatoes

Smashed potatoes all dressed up with flavors of the Mediterranean. Serve these flavorful potatoes warm as a side dish or chill and serve as a refreshing potato salad.

Serves 4

dash-recipehealthy-recipeSide dish recipe

 

 

Dietitian’s Tip: Potatoes are an excellent source of potassium and fiber. They also contain almost half your Daily Value of vitamin C. So, keep potatoes on your table with this flavorful, nutrient-rich and easy-to-prepare recipe.

Ingredients:
1 pound small red potatoes, cleaned, unpeeled
½ cup red onion, diced
1 cup plain lowfat yogurt
2 tablespoons fresh dill, chopped
1 tablespoon fresh parsley, chopped
1 teaspoon fresh garlic, minced
1 tablespoon lemon juice
¼ teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon black pepper

Preparation:
Place potatoes in a medium saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring water to a boil over medium-high heat, reduce heat to simmer and cook potatoes until tender, about 15 – 20 minutes. Drain and cool slightly.Meanwhile, mix the remaining ingredients in a large bowl and set aside.Leave skin on and smash each potato on a cutting board using the bottom of a glass. Add the smashed potatoes to the yogurt dressing and stir to coat potatoes.

Nutrition Information:
Per serving: 127 calories, 1 g total fat, 0.5 g saturated fat, 25 g carbohydrates, 5 g protein, 2 g fiber, 196 mg sodium, 120 mg calciumRecipe courtesy of the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council.

Improving Nutrition, Healthcare Outcomes in Older Adults

Nationwide, up to 60 percent of hospitalized older adults may be malnourished, with an estimated price tag of $51.3 billion. It is no surprise that a 300 percent increase in health care costs can be attributed to poor nutrition status.  In Oregon, Registered Dietitian Nutritionists are in the forefront of the fight to prevent and treat malnutrition.

Partnering with nutrition leaders, Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council is working to raise awareness and has gathered educational tools to help health professionals recognize and treat malnutrition. The resources also help older adults realize that they need to ask about nutrition and advocate for improved care.ask-about-your-nutrition

Oregon Governor Kate Brown joined the Oregon Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in shining the light on the impact of malnutrition – especially in older adults – by proclaiming September 26 to 30 as Malnutrition Awareness Week in Oregon.

Preventing and treating malnutrition can be as simple as following the MyPlate guidelines.  Eating enough food and the right amounts from each food group is the key. Protein is especially important.

Everyone, and especially those at risk of malnutrition such as the ill or elderly, should aim to consume 3-4 ounces of protein at each meal (30 grams). Protein-rich dairy foods are a convenient, affordable and tasty option for seniors.  Try milk (lactose-free, if needed), cheese, Greek yogurt, yogurt and cottage cheese.  Find out what a serving is and how you can get enough with these fact sheets:

Protein Pointers

Eating to Optimize Surgery or Treatment

Eating to Meet Your Body’s Needs

Eating for Your Best Health

Malnutrition awareness is important. Learn more about this issue at this link to a KPTV television story with Providence nutrition services.