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KIDS CORNER

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STORIES ABOUT KIDS



We’re putting dairy on the map!
With Oregon Agriculture in the Classroom’s interactive “Grown in Oregon” map, you can see where your milk and dairy foods like cheese, yogurt and ice cream are made, as well as 30 other locally-grown foods.


Take a Virtual Field Trip to a Dairy Farm

You can visit a dairy farm today, and you don’t even have to get your shoes dirty. Through a partnership with Discovery Education, this new video explains modern dairy farming, dairy’s journey from farm to school, and the innovations that are helping care for cows and communities.


Here are some tasty treats that are good and good for you


Oregon Ag in the Classroom

Oregon Agriculture in the Classroom Literacy Project

In this free program, a volunteer will come to your classroom to do a reading and hands-on lesson that meets Oregon standards.
AITC also has a lending library with ag and dairy focused books.

 


Oregon Dairy Princess Ambassadors

Through classroom presentations and public events, state and county Dairy Princess-Ambassadors provide interesting insights and information about dairy farming and dairy products.


Ag Fest LogoOregon Ag Fest

Kids enjoy this two-day event, aimed at helping families better understand where their food, fiber and flora come from. It is a unique learning experience, where hands-on exhibits make learning about Oregon’s vast agricultural industry educational and entertaining.

Cooking Up New and Nutritious Recipes for School Kids

“What’s for lunch?” It’s a common refrain in school cafeterias across the state, and some tasty plans are in the works to provide exciting new and nutritious menu items. Thanks to a special series of events called “Oregon Cooks for Kids,” school cooks are learning new recipes featuring dairy ingredients that they can take back to their schools.

Sponsored by the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council and the Oregon Department of Education, Child Nutrition Services, seven statewide culinary trainings are being offered for school nutrition directors and cooks in 2016. This year’s schedule includes trainings in Albany, Hermiston, McMinnville, Central Point, Salem, La Grande and Klamath Falls.

Chef Garrett Berdan, RDN, coaches participants on cooking-from-scratch culinary skills, while preparing and taste testing 15 actual recipes. The preparation of healthy meals for students emphasizes nutrient-rich foods, because studies show that well-nourished kids perform better at school. Participants practice menu planning, weights and measures, knife skills and other culinary techniques.

The Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council has supported culinary training events for seven years. Oregon’s 228 dairy farm families and 31 dairy processors are involved with schools across the state — providing nutritious foods to kitchens and cafeterias and leading health and wellness initiatives.

Cafeteria cooks have new tricks up their sleevesCafeteria cooks have new tricks up their sleeves

Statewide culinary trainings are improving the quality and variety of meals served in Oregon schools. Learn more about what happens at these special events with this fun story from KGW TV’s Portland Today.   VIDEO

Healthy Meals for Healthy StudentsHealthy Meals for Healthy Students Trainings

Trainings are presented in partnership with the Oregon Department of Education Child Nutrition Programs and the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council. We train school nutrition and frontline staff, giving them ideas and skills to improve their school meal programs with nutrient-rich recipes, featuring ingredients like low-fat and fat-free milk, cheese and yogurt, whole grains, fruits and vegetables.   VIDEO

 

Funny Questions, Serious Impacts on Dairy Tours

Fresh off of the school bus, wide-eyed youngsters set foot on a dairy farm for the very first time. They’re taking in all of the sights, and yes, the smells.

WATCH VIDEO

The farmer welcomes the students to her dairy and asks, “Do you know where milk comes from?

”Their most common answer? “The grocery store!”

This response shouldn’t come as a surprise when you consider that 98% of the U.S. population are generations removed from the farm. Tours are an excellent way to better inform and educate students about something that directly affects them and their families every day: where their food comes from.

“Most of the kids have never been on a farm. They have never seen farm animals in person,” said Melissa Collman, a dairy farmer in Boring, Oregon. “And even though our dairy isn’t very far away, we are miles apart as far as what they have experienced in life.”

As you might imagine, dairy farm tours can also be a source of humor, so we asked several Oregon dairy farmers and tour guides to tell us about some of the funny things they’ve heard or experienced while leading a tour.

JAMIE BANSEN, FOREST GLEN JERSEYS

Jamie and her dog, Olive, recently hosted a large group including students who had never set foot on a farm, let alone a dairy farm. Like a quick draw in the Old West, these middle schoolers quickly reached for their smartphones to snap photos and video along the way.

Students were amazed that manure is beneficial as a source of energy, bedding and fertilizer. “So wait, cow poop can make electricity and be sold for money?” a student asked. His serious question quickly devolved into laughter as a cow demonstrated the first step of that process.

After one of the girls expressed surprise about how quiet and happy the cows seemed, she decided, “I don’t want to go back to school. I want to pet cows all day.”

STACY FOSTER, RICKREALL DAIRY

“They love to tell me stories about their mom’s, cousin’s, friend’s cow that they saw once,” said Stacy.

Kids have told her they want to live at her dairy and become a farmer. They also want to bring calves home … until they’re reminded that they soon turn in to large cows.

“Some are amazed that we only have cows on our farm, since the only other farmer they know is Old McDonald,” she said. When the kids ask to see the other animals, like chickens, her answer makes the parent chaperones laugh. “Those animals don’t like to be milked, so they live on a different farm.”

CASEY SCHOCH, SCHOCH DAIRY AND CREAMERY

“On one of our tours, a little boy told me a cow joke,” said Casey. “What do you call a cow that has had her baby? De-calf-inated!

”Many of the kids ask to see the brown cows that make the chocolate milk, she said, but followed that it isn’t just the kids who ask funny questions.

“I actually had a mom ask me in all seriousness why we don’t milk the bulls,” said Casey, “I then tried to explain that similar to human females, only female cows have the correct parts for producing milk.”

MELISSA COLLMAN, CLOUD CAP DAIRY

Beyond the innocent and funny questions like whether boy cows make milk, Melissa expressed concern that students often echo some bizarre myths about dairy farming spread on social media and blog posts.

A student approached Melissa on a tour about rumors he heard about strange ingredients in milk. “So I milked a cow in front of this little boy, and he got to see for himself,” she said. “He was shocked.”

“It’s really important that we as farmers help educate consumers and future generations,” she said. “The funny questions and comments I hear on farm tours just reaffirm that any time we spend with the kids is time well spent.”

Catch a glimpse of some children discovering a dairy farm for the very first time in the video below.

 

Pear Quesadillas

Food Hero has a wealth of easy to make, nutritious recipes to liven up your summer days. Here is an easy summer lunch idea for the kids … or yourself.

Serves 4

dash-recipehealthy-recipeentree-recipe

 

 

Dietitian’s Tip: This recipe is a great addition to a healthy diet serving up dairy protein, fruit, vegetables, and whole grains. Come up with your own combination using different fruits and vegetables.

 

INGREDIENTS

4 medium whole wheat tortillas
1 cup grated cheese (try cheddar, jack, or pepper jack)
1 cup pear slices (fresh or canned/drained)
½ cup finely chopped green or red peppers
2 tablespoons minced onion (green, red, or yellow)

 

INSTRUCTIONS

Lay two tortillas on two plates.

Divide the cheese between the two tortillas.

Divide the pears, peppers, and onion between the two tortillas.

Top with remaining two tortillas.

Heat a skillet or griddle to medium (300 degrees in an electric skillet). Place one quesadilla in pan. Cook 2-4 minutes, or until bottom of quesadilla begins to look a little brown.

With large spatula, gently turn the quesadilla over and cook the other side until a little brown, 2-4 minutes.

Gently slide quesadilla onto a plate. Cook the second quesadilla.

Cut each cooked quesadilla into 4 pieces and serve.

 

NUTRITIONAL FACTS

Per serving: 250 calories, 8 g total fat, 3.5 g saturated fat, 31 g carbohydrate, 11 g protein, 4 g dietary fiber, 400 mg sodium

Recipe courtesy of Food Hero

Discover the Art of Dairy

Throughout Portland, Salem and the state of Oregon, you can find artistic interpretations of dairy cows and dairy farming on public display … if you know where to look. For June Dairy Month, we picked six of our favorites for a visual scavenger hunt that we called “Dairy Everywhere.”

It wasn’t easy, but Mary Owen of Salem was able to identify (at least partially) four of the six locations, earning her an Undeniably Dairy prize package. “This was a tough contest!” said Owen, “I learned a lot through it though.”

As promised when the contest was announced, here are the locations:

We’re hearing rumors that a very special Brown Swiss cow could be added to Albany’s Historic Carousel and Museum sometime soon. Although this contest is over, you can send us additional suggestions to be added to our online gallery of dairy art anytime. Happy hunting!

Former NFL Player Tackles Dairy Farming For a Day

Over his 12-year career in the National Football League, Anthony Newman regularly faced finely-tuned athletes weighing more than 300 pounds. But it wasn’t until he visited a dairy farm that he came eye to eye with a finely-tuned 1,300 pounder – a Holstein cow at Rickreall Dairy.

As a supporter of one of the nation’s largest in-school nutrition and physical activity programs, Fuel Up to Play 60, Newman regularly encourages kids to eat healthy, be active and make positive changes in their schools and communities. He’s a big fan of including milk and dairy products in a healthy diet, but he had never had the opportunity to visit a dairy farm.

Located outside of Oregon’s state capital of Salem, Rickreall Dairy was a 2017 U.S. Dairy Sustainability Award winner. Newman took an all-access tour of the farm, and he was impressed. After seeing how well the cows are treated, what they eat, how natural resources are protected and meeting the employees, he said he gained new appreciation for how much hard work and dedication it takes to keep a dairy farm running.

Since retiring from football, Newman has been a successful sports broadcaster and devotes his time to support youth through sports camps, coaching and speaking about the importance of health and wellness for the Fuel Up to Play 60 program. Inspired and led by youth, Fuel Up to Play 60 was created by the National Dairy Council and the NFL, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The program is administered in Oregon by the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council.

View the embedded video to hear Anthony Newman’s thoughts and observations after experiencing dairy farming for a day at Rickreall Dairy.

New School Meals on the Menu for Oregon Students

The words “school cafeteria food” are taking on new meaning as Chef Garrett Berdan is training a growing number of child nutrition program professionals to prepare delicious and nutritious food for Oregon students.

A series of six culinary training events are underway to help improve school cafeteria menus statewide. With support from the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council and the Oregon Department of Education, Child Nutrition Programs, this popular program is now in its eighth year.

The 2018 series includes Central Point, Nyssa, Bend, Salem, Umatilla and Hood River.

Chef Garrett Berdan, RDN, coaches child nutrition program professionals on cooking-from-scratch culinary skills, while preparing 15 different recipes. It is offered at no cost to school nutrition professionals, who are able to practice menu planning, weights and measures, knife skills and other culinary techniques.

The preparation of healthy meals for students emphasizes nutrient-rich foods, because studies show that well-nourished kids perform better in school.

“These trainings use Oregon State University Extension Food Hero recipes that meet USDA school nutrition requirements and emphasize using locally produced foods and ingredients,” said Erin Hirte, Manager of Youth Wellness for the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council. “Oregon farmers are helping provide creative solutions to old challenges that will benefit students now and into the future.”

Oregon’s dairy farm families and processors invest in youth wellness and education. They are involved with schools across the state, supporting programs such as this training.

 

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White Chocolate Mint Whoopie Pies

I’m Dreaming of a White … Chocolate Mint Whoopie Pie.

These cookies are ‘mint’ to be for parties, gift baskets or a fun baking project with your kids during the holiday season. Try one bite, and you’ll be saying “whoopee” for whoopie pies.

Makes 2 dozen whoopie pies

indulgent-recipeDessert recipe

INGREDIENTS
Chocolate Cookies:

2 cups all-purpose flour
½ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1 ½ teaspoons baking soda
½ teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
1 cup granulated sugar
½ cup butter, softened
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 large egg
1 cup milk

White Chocolate Mint Buttercream Filling:
2 ounces chopped white chocolate
5 tablespoons heavy cream, divided
½ cup butter, softened
3 ¾ cups (1 1-pound box) powdered sugar
1 teaspoon pure mint extract (or peppermint extract)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/8 teaspoon salt
10 peppermint candies, crushed into fine pieces

INSTRUCTIONS

Preheat oven to 375˚. Line baking sheets with parchment paper.

For Cookies:

Combine flour, cocoa, baking soda, baking powder, and salt in medium bowl; set aside.

Beat together sugar, butter, vanilla and egg in large bowl with electric mixer on medium speed until well combined. Stir in milk. Gradually beat in flour mixture on low speed.

Drop batter by rounded tablespoonfuls 2 inches apart onto prepared baking sheets.

Bake until edges appear set, 7 to 9 minutes. Cool on pan 1 minute. Remove to wire rack and cool completely.

For White Chocolate Mint Buttercream Filling:

Combine white chocolate and 3 tablespoons cream in microwave-safe bowl. Heat for one minute at medium (50%) power, stirring at 30-second intervals until melted and smooth. Cool to room temperature.

Beat butter in large bowl with electric mixer on medium speed until creamy. Gradually beat in powdered sugar, the remaining 2 tablespoons heavy cream, mint extract, vanilla and salt on low speed until blended.

To assemble, spread the bottom sides of half the cookies with the White Chocolate Mint Buttercream Filling. Top with the remaining cookies, bottom sides down; press gently together. Sprinkle the edges of the buttercream with crushed peppermint candies.

Recipe submitted to Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council by Edwina Gadsby

Ten Oregon Dairy Farms to Follow on Facebook

Did you know there are more than 2 billion active users on Facebook, and the average person follows 338? You can follow your hairdresser, your kid’s school teachers and even your post office on social media – but are you following your local dairy farmer? You should.

By following farmers on Facebook, you can get to know the families who help deliver nutritious and delicious food to your table. Just like no two farms are exactly alike, their Facebook pages are unique, representing conventional and organic farms ranging from 20 cows to more than 20,000. Some include stories, behind the scenes videos, humor, answers to your questions, beautiful photography and even invitations to visit.

Here are ten Oregon dairy farmers you should be following on Facebook (in alphabetical order):

RELATED LINKS

New Adopt a Farmer Video Features Oregon Dairy

Thanks to Oregon dairy farmers like Bobbi Frost from Harrold’s Dairy, local students have the opportunity to experience a dairy farm and better understand agriculture. She is featured in a new video for Oregon Aglink’s Adopt a Farmer program.

“The majority of people in our country don’t have any experience with agriculture,” said Frost. “So really you’re bringing in your expertise, you’re teaching the teacher and giving her the skills to teach more kids and you’re giving the kids the opportunity to learn, too.”

The Adopt a Farmer program is an innovative program connecting sixth, seventh and eighth grade students to the sources of their food and fiber. Started in 2011, the program has grown from 300 students in the first year to more than 5,000 in six years. So far, the program has partnered with 48 Oregon schools, including interaction and experiences both in the classroom and on the farm.

“When they have a chance to get out and actually go to a dairy farm and see the cows and see the whole process, I think it makes it more real for them and they have an appreciation,” said Mindy Hayner, a parent from Coburg Community Charter School who is featured in the video.

Various other Oregon dairy farms have been included in the Adopt a Farmer program in recent years. In addition to Harrold’s Dairy, this year’s farms included Cloud Cap Farms, Mayfield Dairy and Veeman’s Dairy. Bobbi Frost is a strong supporter of the program and encourages other farmers to get involved.

“By being a farmer and telling your story, you’re debunking the myths, you’re giving the answers that you want kids to know, you’re giving them a shot at what actually happens on a farm,” said Frost. “You are telling your story, and nobody can tell it better than the actual farmer can tell it.”

RELATED LINKS:

Dairy Meets Classroom: Melissa Collman of Cloud Cap Farms

Adopt a Farmer, Oregon AgLink

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